DYERS CHAMOMILE GOLDEN MARGUERITE DAISY ANTHEMIS TINCTORIA – A STUNNING (AND USEFUL) DISPLAY OF HUNDREDS OF FLOWERS! $1.50

DYER’S CHAMOMILE USED TO DYE WOOL AND FABRIC FOR CENTURIES! A HERBAL TREASURE, THE GOLDEN MARGUERITE – ANTHEMIS TINCTORIA – SO MANY SHINING YELLOW FLOWERS YOU WILL HARDLY SEE THE LUSCIOUS SILVERY FOLIAGE UNDERNEATH! – IF YOU NEED SOME SUNSHINE IN YOUR LIFE – PICK THESE!

Such a fabulous display of brilliant golden yellow daisy type flower heads! These plants are so prolific that the entire plant will be covered in flowers, completely hiding the foliage making a superb display, especially edging pathways. In the wild they are often found on the dry hillsides of the Mediterranean.

Dyers’ Chamomile (or camomile) has dark green serrated leaves with a pleasant smell. In the summer, this bushy plant produces masses of long-lasting, yellow daisy-like flowers each with a dome-shaped centre. It grows 45 to 60 cm tall and looks good as a bedding plant.

Dyers Chamomile grows very quickly from seed and it can be grown as an annual.

Growers notes:

Soil: Any soil type, but thrives in well-drained soil.

Maintenance: A light sprinkling of liquid fertiliser in spring will ensure good foliage and flower growth.

Trim back foliage after flowering to keep them compact.

Easily grown from seed – may produce variations on the common yellow which are generally highly sought after.

Prefers full sun with well-drained soil.

Sow
Raise seedlings in Spring, early Summer and late Winter. Planting seeds 2mm deep.

Keep soil moist, not wet.

Germination
20-30 days at 18-22°C

Maturity
90-110 days.

DYING ADVICE FROM WILDCOLOURS.CO. UK

FOR DYING:
It is a good idea to harvest the flower heads when they are starting to wilt as this will promote further flowering. You can use the flowers fresh or you can dry them to be used later. The flowers are quite bulky, and you will need about one and a half litres of dry flowers to make 100 grams.

The warm yellows produced by Dyers’ Chamomile are a useful complement to the lemon yellows obtained from weld. Although not as light fast as weld this warmer yellow is an asset for over-dyeing, yielding different shades of green and orange. The compounds that give the yellow colour are flavonoids and they work better on wool or silk rather than on cotton.

Adding half a teaspoon of chalk to the dye bath makes stronger yellows and I have found that the colours become darker and brighter after the dyed wool is washed using washing up liquid.

Use 200 to 400 grams of dry flower heads for 100 grams of wool (and use a bit more if you are weighing fresh flowers). 200 grams of flowers will just about fill a 3 litres container (about half an average shoe box), so it is quite a lot of flowers. Simmer the flowers for one hour, strain them, add mordanted fibre to the yellow liquid and simmer for another hour.

100 gm of flowers – pale yellow
200 gm of flowers – yellow
300 gm of flowers – medium yellow
400 gm of flowers – dark yellow
200 gm of flowers + ½ tsp chalk – dark yellow
200 gm of flowers – overdyed with woad

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Seed Count: 25
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