ALL SPICE SEEDS PODS PINTO PIMENTA DOICA ALLSPICE $1.50

PIMENTA DOICA IS THE “ALL SPICE” WE USE FOR COOKING! FRESH PODS WITH FERTILE SEEDS! RARE TO FIND AND WITH AN AMAZING HISTORY, PIMENTA IS SAID TO ONLY GERMINATE IN JAMAICA BUT THEY GROW HERE JUST FINE TOO! YOU WILL GET 10 SEED PODS WITH TWO TO THREE SEEDS IN EACH ONE, WE SUGGEST STARTING PRE-TREATMENT AND PLANTING IMMEDIATELY UPON ARRIVAL.

Allspice, alternatively known as Jamaica pepper, myrtle pepper, pimenta, or pimento, is derived from the dried unripe berries of the Pimenta dioica tree, originally indigenous to the Greater Antilles, southern Mexico, and Central America. While its cultivation has spread to various warm regions globally, its English moniker, “allspice,” dates back to as early as 1621, attributed to its ability to encapsulate the flavors of cinnamon, nutmeg, and clove in one spice. In most local supermarkets, you’ll find it conveniently ground into a powder.

The process begins with harvesting the green, unripe berries, which are then traditionally sun-dried until they attain a rich brown hue, resembling smooth, large peppercorns. Beyond its culinary application, the leaves of the Pimenta dioica tree, akin in texture to bay leaves, also find their way into cooking. Furthermore, both leaves and wood serve as popular agents for smoking meats, particularly in regions where allspice thrives.

Characterized as an evergreen shrub, the Allspice tree can attain heights ranging from 10 to 18 meters. It offers versatility in its growth, able to be pruned into a compact tree or allowed to grow into a towering canopy, often utilized to provide shade for crops like coffee planted beneath it. With suitable conditions, including normal garden soil and consistent watering, it flourishes outdoors in tropical and subtropical climates.

Grow Notes
Space multiple trees at least 20 feet apart to provide adequate room for root growth.

Smaller plants can be killed by frost, although larger plants are more tolerant. It adapts well to container culture and can be kept as a houseplant or in a greenhouse.

Sow
WE SUGGEST STARTING PRE-TREATMENT AND PLANTING IMMEDIATELY UPON ARRIVAL.

Pre-treatment. Soak the pods to soften. Score around each pod with a utility knife and remove the two halves. Extract the twin seeds from inside the pod. Soak the seeds in warm water for 24 hours to weaken the outer hull.

Prepare a growing container for each allspice tree you want to grow. Fill 4-inch starter pots with a moistened mix of half compost and half coarse sand or perlite. Firm the mixture into the pot to collapse any air pockets.

Sow one allspice seed in each container. Poke a 5cm deep planting hole in the moistened mixture. Place the allspice seed in the hole and cover it with compost. Mist the compost to settle it.

Place the potted allspice seeds in a warm place, they will need at least 20 to 26 degrees daytime temps to germinate, and they need very bright natural light. Cover the pots with a propagation dome or plastic wrap to increase humidity around the seeds.

Check the moisture level in the compost mixture every day to make sure it never fully dries out. Add water whenever it feels mostly dry just below the surface. Water until the top inch is moderately moist.

Keep the seedlings under the wrap or the propagation dome, until they grow to 2 inches high. Transplant the allspice seedlings into 6-inch pots filled with a mix of half potting soil and half coarse sand. Grow them in a sheltered area with very bright, diffuse light during their first summer. Provide an inch of water every week. Shield them from direct sun at midday.

Transplant the allspice saplings into a permanent bed in autumn after the first rain. Choose a planting site with full sun and loamy, fast-draining soil.

Germination
Watch for germination in two weeks, but don’t be discouraged if it takes up to three months for some of the allspice seeds to sprout.

Allspice trees propagate best from seeds, which will produce a transplantable specimen in approximately six months.

Maturity
The trees will begin to bear fruit when they become three years old or older.

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Seed Count: 10
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