PAY $40 AND GET $50 IN SEED CREDIT! PERFECT FOR SEEDAHOLICS! WE NOW HAVE GIFT VOUCHERS! We can design your voucher for any occasion! Add your picture to the voucher and design it the way you want! If you are just going to use it for yourself we can sendSee more...
PAY $40 AND GET $50 IN SEED CREDIT! PERFECT FOR SEEDAHOLICS!
WE NOW HAVE GIFT VOUCHERS!
We can design your voucher for any occasion! Add your picture to the voucher and design it the way you want! If you are just going to use it for yourself we can send you a credit voucher direct to your email!
Just let us know your wording, send us a file with your pictures if you have some, we can email your voucher to you or your loved one or send you a file via email or Facebook so you can send it yourself!
If you want to send more than $50 just buy as many vouchers as you like and put a note on the order to tell us the details.
Not exchangeable for cash.
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Turmeric, Curcuma longa, is one of the ancient spices of Asia. The root is an essential ingredient of curry and primarily responsible for the yellow colour. The fresh leaf is used as a wrap to flavour food in cooking. Current folk use of the root as a remedy for adultSee more...

Turmeric, Curcuma longa, is one of the ancient spices of Asia. The root is an essential ingredient of curry and primarily responsible for the yellow colour. The fresh leaf is used as a wrap to flavour food in cooking. Current folk use of the root as a remedy for adult diabetics, carpel tunnel syndrome, heart problems and immune system support. The powdered root produces a gold-yellow dye. A perennial plant, growing to 0.5m x 0.5m.

5CM X 3 CM CORMS. MAY ABLE TO BE DIVIDED.

WE RECOMMEND THAT IF YOUR PARCEL IS GOING TO TAKE MORE THAN 5 DAYS TO ARRIVE BY AUSSIE POST THAT YOU DO NOT BUY.  YOU CAN REMEDY THIS BY CHOOSING EXPRESS SATCHELS. WE CANNOT GUARANTEE THE VIABILITY/CONDITION OF THE CORMS ONCE POSTED ALTHOUGH WE DO TAKE PAINS TO MAKE SURE THEY WILL BE HAPPY AND HEALTHY ON ARRIVAL.  REMEMBER THAT YOU CAN FILL A SATCHEL WITH OTHER ITEMS – UP TO 50 PACKETS OF SEEDS OR SOME BEE LIGHTS FOR YOUR GARDEN OR ANY NUMBER OF THINGS!  SHOP NOW AND MAKE THE MOST OF THE SATCHEL! ALSO SEE OUR GALANGAL CORMS IN STORE NOW!

Grow Notes
Make sure you remove them from any plastic wrapping and plant immediately.

Turmeric is native to India and Asia preferring rich, moist and well-draining, soils in a protected, shaded position.

Drought and frost tender.

Sow
Sow direct in Spring and Summer at 5cm deep into damp soil with 30cm between plants.

Keep soil moist, not wet.

Maturity
160-190 days.

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HEALTHY, A+ GRADE GINGER RHIZOMES THAT ARE UNTREATED WITH GROWTH RETARDANTS, NATURALLY GROWN AND DUG OUT WHEN WE NEED THEM! THESE ARE GROWN WITH NO PESTICIDES AT A LOCAL HOBBY FARM THAT SUPPLIES US AS WE NEED THEM SO THEY ARE ALWAYS FRESH! THERE MAY BE A SLIGHT DELAY ONSee more...

HEALTHY, A+ GRADE GINGER RHIZOMES THAT ARE UNTREATED WITH GROWTH RETARDANTS, NATURALLY GROWN AND DUG OUT WHEN WE NEED THEM! THESE ARE GROWN WITH NO PESTICIDES AT A LOCAL HOBBY FARM THAT SUPPLIES US AS WE NEED THEM SO THEY ARE ALWAYS FRESH! THERE MAY BE A SLIGHT DELAY ON POSTAGE AS I HAVE TO PICK UP YOUR RHIZOMES FRESH.

YOU WILL GET ONE MEDIUM/LARGE RHIZOME.

Ginger is a member of a plant family that includes cardamom and turmeric. Its spicy aroma is mainly due to presence of ketones, especially the gingerols, which appear to be the primary component of ginger studied in much of the health-related scientific research. The rhizome, which is the horizontal stem from which the roots grow, is the main portion of ginger that is consumed. Ginger’s current name comes from the Middle English gingivere, but this spice dates back over 3000 years to the Sanskrit word srngaveram, meaning “horn root,” based on its appearance. In Greek, it was called ziggiberis, and in Latin, zinziberi. Interestingly, ginger does not grow in the wild and its actual origins are uncertain.

Indians and Chinese are believed to have produced ginger as a tonic root for over 5000 years to treat many ailments, and this plant is now cultivated throughout the humid tropics, with India being the largest producer. Ginger was used as a flavoring agent long before history was formally recorded. It was an exceedingly important article of trade and was exported from India to the Roman Empire over 2000 years ago, where it was especially valued for its medicinal properties. Ginger continued to be a highly sought after commodity in Europe even after the fall of the Roman Empire, with Arab merchants controlling the trade in ginger and other spices for centuries. In the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, the value of a pound of ginger was equivalent to the cost of a sheep. By medieval times, it was being imported in preserved form to be used in sweets. Queen Elizabeth I of England is credited with the invention of the gingerbread man, which became a popular Christmas treat.

Ginger is used in numerous forms, including fresh, dried, pickled, preserved, crystallized, candied, and powdered or ground. The flavor is somewhat peppery and slightly sweet, with a strong and spicy aroma. The concentration of essential oils increases as ginger ages and, therefore, the intended use of the rhizome determines the time when it is harvested. If extracting the oil is the main purpose, then ginger can be harvested at 9 months or longer. Ginger is commonly pickled in sweet vinegar, which turns it a pink colour; this form is popular with sushi.

Ginger harvested at 8-9 months has a tough skin that must be removed before eating, and the root is more pungent and is used dried or pulverized into ground ginger. This is the form most commonly found in our spice racks and used in cookies, cakes, and curry mixes. Candied or crystallized ginger is cooked in sugar syrup and coated with granulated sugar. Ginger harvested at 5 months is not yet mature and has a very thin skin, and the rhizomes are tender with a mild flavour and are best used in fresh or preserved forms.

Grow Notes
Make sure you remove them from any plastic wrapping and plant immediately.

Plant in part or full sun with moist, well-drained soil.

Frost Tender Perennial.

Sow
Sow direct in Spring and Summer at 3cm deep into damp soil with 30cm between plants.

Keep soil moist, not wet.

Maturity
150-200 days.

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The Hawaiian Sunshine sweet potato is a medium to large sweet potato with a lovely colour! Slice it and it starts out a rich cream, wait and it slowly turns purple with splotches of white and cream! Some potatoes when cut will have a single ring of purple around theSee more...

The Hawaiian Sunshine sweet potato is a medium to large sweet potato with a lovely colour! Slice it and it starts out a rich cream, wait and it slowly turns purple with splotches of white and cream! Some potatoes when cut will have a single ring of purple around the outer rim, some will have a ring and “stars” of purple splotches, some will have lots of purple. Beautiful!

You will receive one whole potato or a piece of a large one, you can plant it whole or cut it ensuring their is an “eye” on each piece and make more plants 🙂 Save some of your crop to plant again and have them endlessly!

If you live in the Eastern States of Australia we will not post in a red satchel, it MUST be express. Thanks 🙂

 

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A RICH HISTORY! NAMED IN ROMAN TIMES, USED TO STAUNCH THE BLOOD OF SOLDIERS - IT'S NAME WAS DERIVED FROM ARCHILLES, HOMER'S HERO IN THE ILLIAD. Achillea ptarmica “The Pearl” flowers in only three weeks from germination. Elegant sprays of pure white single and double, pom-pom flowers are borne overSee more...

A RICH HISTORY! NAMED IN ROMAN TIMES, USED TO STAUNCH THE BLOOD OF SOLDIERS – IT’S NAME WAS DERIVED FROM ARCHILLES, HOMER’S HERO IN THE ILLIAD.

Achillea ptarmica “The Pearl” flowers in only three weeks from germination. Elegant sprays of pure white single and double, pom-pom flowers are borne over a long period above finely toothed, dark green leaves. It spreads to form a natural mound and is equally happy as a bedding plant annual or as a hardy perennial for the herbaceous border.

A favourite of Edwardian garden designer Gertrude Jekyll, it is excellent for the middle of a sunny, well-drained border, especially when planted as a large drift and looks great with a backdrop of evergreens. The flowers are suitable for fresh cutting and also for drying.

Achillea is a flowering plant in the family Asteraceae, native to the Northern Hemisphere.

Named by Linnaeus, its name is said to derive from Achilles. Homer’s hero in the Iliad, who was well-trained in healing wounds as well as in causing them. He was reputed to have used it to staunch the bleeding wounds of his soldiers.

The name ptarmica comes from the Greek word ptairo and means “causes sneezing”. As the name implies, this plant offered sneezing as a remedy for those with stuffy heads. Named in warning for hay fever sufferers. Long flowering and drought-tolerant, this is a unique, easy and reliable plant to add to any border.

Grow Notes
Long flowering and drought-tolerant, this is a unique, easy and reliable plant to add to any border.

Sow

Sowing: Sow February to June AND September to December.

Sow the seeds into cells or pots containing good quality seed compost. Sow on the surface and do not cover, as light aids germination of seeds.

Water from the base of the tray and place in a propagator or warm place, ideally at 18 to 22°C. Keep the compost moist but not wet at all times. Germination 7 to 14 days.

Germination

7 to 14 days.

Maturity
Flowers can appear in only three weeks from germination if it’s happy!

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NOTHING LOOKS HAPPIER IN A GARDEN THAN THESE! WITH HOT AND SUNNY COLOURS AND AN EASY CARE ATTITUDE, LONG LIVED AND ABLE TO WITHSTAND DOUGHT AND SANDY SOILS, THE AFRICAN DAISY IS AN ALL ROUND WINNER! EDIBLE FLOWERS IN LOTS OF COLOURS FROM BRIGHTS TO PASTELS! African Daisies go bySee more...

NOTHING LOOKS HAPPIER IN A GARDEN THAN THESE! WITH HOT AND SUNNY COLOURS AND AN EASY CARE ATTITUDE, LONG LIVED AND ABLE TO WITHSTAND DOUGHT AND SANDY SOILS, THE AFRICAN DAISY IS AN ALL ROUND WINNER! EDIBLE FLOWERS IN LOTS OF COLOURS FROM BRIGHTS TO PASTELS!

African Daisies go by other names such as Cape daisy, blue-eyed daisy, and South African daisy. The botanical name, also called the scientific name, is Osteospermum spp. As the name suggests, they are native to South Africa, thus are drought and heat tolerant once established.  The African daisy was discovered in the 19th century and quickly became popular in other areas of the world.

They thrive under hot, dry conditions. They close their flowers when the sun goes in!

Grow Notes
Prefers full sun in sandy, well-draining soils.

Sow
Sow direct or raise seedlings in Spring about 6 weeks before the last frost or early Summer. Plant seeds by sprinkling them on the soil – do not cover, 30 to 45 cm spacing. DO NOT COVER SEEDS AS THEY NEED LIGHT FOR GERMINATION.

Keep soil moist, not wet until germination. Water at the roots about once or twice a week in hot weather.

Germination
14-21 days.

 

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PIMENTA DOICA IS THE “ALL SPICE” WE USE FOR COOKING! FRESH PODS WITH FERTILE SEEDS! RARE TO FIND AND WITH AN AMAZING HISTORY, PIMENTA IS SAID TO ONLY GERMINATE IN JAMAICA BUT THEY GROW HERE JUST FINE TOO! YOU WILL GET 10 SEED PODS WITH TWO TO THREE SEEDS INSee more...

PIMENTA DOICA IS THE “ALL SPICE” WE USE FOR COOKING! FRESH PODS WITH FERTILE SEEDS! RARE TO FIND AND WITH AN AMAZING HISTORY, PIMENTA IS SAID TO ONLY GERMINATE IN JAMAICA BUT THEY GROW HERE JUST FINE TOO! YOU WILL GET 10 SEED PODS WITH TWO TO THREE SEEDS IN EACH ONE, WE SUGGEST STARTING PRE-TREATMENT AND PLANTING IMMEDIATELY UPON ARRIVAL.

Allspice, alternatively known as Jamaica pepper, myrtle pepper, pimenta, or pimento, is derived from the dried unripe berries of the Pimenta dioica tree, originally indigenous to the Greater Antilles, southern Mexico, and Central America. While its cultivation has spread to various warm regions globally, its English moniker, “allspice,” dates back to as early as 1621, attributed to its ability to encapsulate the flavors of cinnamon, nutmeg, and clove in one spice. In most local supermarkets, you’ll find it conveniently ground into a powder.

The process begins with harvesting the green, unripe berries, which are then traditionally sun-dried until they attain a rich brown hue, resembling smooth, large peppercorns. Beyond its culinary application, the leaves of the Pimenta dioica tree, akin in texture to bay leaves, also find their way into cooking. Furthermore, both leaves and wood serve as popular agents for smoking meats, particularly in regions where allspice thrives.

Characterized as an evergreen shrub, the Allspice tree can attain heights ranging from 10 to 18 meters. It offers versatility in its growth, able to be pruned into a compact tree or allowed to grow into a towering canopy, often utilized to provide shade for crops like coffee planted beneath it. With suitable conditions, including normal garden soil and consistent watering, it flourishes outdoors in tropical and subtropical climates.

Grow Notes
Space multiple trees at least 20 feet apart to provide adequate room for root growth.

Smaller plants can be killed by frost, although larger plants are more tolerant. It adapts well to container culture and can be kept as a houseplant or in a greenhouse.

Sow
WE SUGGEST STARTING PRE-TREATMENT AND PLANTING IMMEDIATELY UPON ARRIVAL.

Pre-treatment. Soak the pods to soften. Score around each pod with a utility knife and remove the two halves. Extract the twin seeds from inside the pod. Soak the seeds in warm water for 24 hours to weaken the outer hull.

Prepare a growing container for each allspice tree you want to grow. Fill 4-inch starter pots with a moistened mix of half compost and half coarse sand or perlite. Firm the mixture into the pot to collapse any air pockets.

Sow one allspice seed in each container. Poke a 5cm deep planting hole in the moistened mixture. Place the allspice seed in the hole and cover it with compost. Mist the compost to settle it.

Place the potted allspice seeds in a warm place, they will need at least 20 to 26 degrees daytime temps to germinate, and they need very bright natural light. Cover the pots with a propagation dome or plastic wrap to increase humidity around the seeds.

Check the moisture level in the compost mixture every day to make sure it never fully dries out. Add water whenever it feels mostly dry just below the surface. Water until the top inch is moderately moist.

Keep the seedlings under the wrap or the propagation dome, until they grow to 2 inches high. Transplant the allspice seedlings into 6-inch pots filled with a mix of half potting soil and half coarse sand. Grow them in a sheltered area with very bright, diffuse light during their first summer. Provide an inch of water every week. Shield them from direct sun at midday.

Transplant the allspice saplings into a permanent bed in autumn after the first rain. Choose a planting site with full sun and loamy, fast-draining soil.

Germination
Watch for germination in two weeks, but don’t be discouraged if it takes up to three months for some of the allspice seeds to sprout.

Allspice trees propagate best from seeds, which will produce a transplantable specimen in approximately six months.

Maturity
The trees will begin to bear fruit when they become three years old or older.

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IS YOUR GARDEN UNDER ATTACK OR IS IT JUST THIS AMAZING PLANT?! LOOKING LIKE A HUGE OCTOPUS ABOUT TO DEVOUR YOUR DAISIES, THIS IS A TRUE TALKING POINT AND WE ARE VERY LUCKY INDEED TO GET THE SEEDS! AMARANTHUS OESCHBERG! Description Aubergine leaves and branched flower spikes smoulder among flowersSee more...

IS YOUR GARDEN UNDER ATTACK OR IS IT JUST THIS AMAZING PLANT?! LOOKING LIKE A HUGE OCTOPUS ABOUT TO DEVOUR YOUR DAISIES, THIS IS A TRUE TALKING POINT AND WE ARE VERY LUCKY INDEED TO GET THE SEEDS! AMARANTHUS OESCHBERG!

Description
Aubergine leaves and branched flower spikes smoulder among flowers of dark red and chartreuse green in your garden. An Award of Garden Merit honours this full, long blooming selection. Beautiful and useful too; the young plants can be harvested as salad greens, and the nutritious seeds mature in late summer to feed you and local birds! Self-sows for next season!

Oeschberg is an amazing deep purple-red amaranth with an upright growth habit. Seed heads are very highly branched and hold their colour longer than other varieties, making it great for flower arrangements.

Leaves and seeds are edible. Leaves are good for a heat resistant salad green when young, red colour develops early.

Grow Notes
Growing to between 100-120cm, plant in free draining rich, moist soil in sun for the best flowers. Preparing garden beds with well composted manure will give the best results.

Amaranthus seeds can be either sown in pots or directly where they are to flower. They are susceptible to frost so be sure to sow only after the last chance of frost has past and the soil has warmed a little.

Mulch plants to keep the shallow roots cool in summer. For an extra-long flowering season, remove spent blooms and feed with liquid fertiliser.

Sow
Small seeds, sow at a depth of 3mm or mix with fine grains of sand if needed to aid distribution of seeds. Can be sown direct or raised as seedlings.

Plant in Spring at 60cm spacing. Water seedlings regularly until established and continue to provide water especially during dry spells.

Germination
7-10 days @ 20-25°C

Maturity
100 days to Maturity.

 

Pic attributed to Jackie Dee.

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AMARANTHUS VIRIDIS IS ALSO KNOWN AS THE SLENDER AMARANTH! USED IN JAMAICA, THE MALDIVES, INDIA AND OTHER CULTURES FOR FOOD AND MEDICINES! Description Edible leaves, it is cooked as a spinach substitute. The leafy stems and flower clusters are similarly used. Seed is very small, about 1mm in diameter, butSee more...

AMARANTHUS VIRIDIS IS ALSO KNOWN AS THE SLENDER AMARANTH! USED IN JAMAICA, THE MALDIVES, INDIA AND OTHER CULTURES FOR FOOD AND MEDICINES!

Description
Edible leaves, it is cooked as a spinach substitute. The leafy stems and flower clusters are similarly used. Seed is very small, about 1mm in diameter, but it is easy to harvest and very nutritious. The seed can be cooked whole, and becomes very gelatinous like this, but it is rather difficult to crush all of the small seeds in the mouth and thus some of the seed will pass right through the digestive system without being assimilated.

Medicinal plant, a decoction of the entire plant is used to stop dysentery and inflammation. The plant is emollient and vermifuge. The root juice is used to treat inflammation during urination. It is also taken to treat constipation. Always consult a medical or herbal practitioner before embarking on any program of using a new medical herb. Some herbs should not be taken in certain situations, for example pregnancy, or for certain health conditions where adverse reactions may be possible. Alternatively, you may have allergies to an herb, or induce side effects from other medication and health conditions. So please do not take without qualified medical advice.

Yellow and green dyes can also be obtained from the whole plant!

Grow Notes
Growing to 30 to 60 cm high from seeds each year. The stems are slender with leaves being broad near their base and narrow near the top. Plant in free draining rich, moist soil in sun for the best flowers. Preparing garden beds with well composted manure will give the best results.

Amaranthus seeds can be either sown in pots or directly where they are to flower. They are susceptible to frost so be sure to sow only after the last chance of frost has past and the soil has warmed a little.

Mulch plants to keep the shallow roots cool in summer. For an extra-long flowering season, remove spent blooms and feed with liquid fertiliser.

Sow
Small seeds, sow at a depth of 3mm or mix with fine grains of sand if needed to aid distribution of seeds. Can be sown direct or raised as seedlings.

Plant in Spring and early Summer at 30cm spacing.
Water seedlings regularly until established and continue to provide water especially during dry spells.

Germination
7-10 days @ 20-25°C

Maturity
105 days to Maturity.

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A fine cut flower and garden plant this native of Egypt produces beautiful 15cm lacy heads of soft white flowers. Last well in a vase and makes an exciting addition to a mixed border. Ammi Visnaga Essential Oil is processed from Ammi Visnaga seeds. Steam Inhalation of its vapours isSee more...

A fine cut flower and garden plant this native of Egypt produces beautiful 15cm lacy heads of soft white flowers. Last well in a vase and makes an exciting addition to a mixed border. Ammi Visnaga Essential Oil is processed from Ammi Visnaga seeds. Steam Inhalation of its vapours is said to be a good remedy to treat Asthma. It is said to have a relaxing effect on all kinds of Spasms in the tissues, especially in case of Bronchitis, thus, acts as an Antispasmodic. Kidney stones were treated with this in ancient Egypt.

Ammi visnaga is a natural substance long used in herbal medicine to treat conditions ranging from menstrual cramps to atherosclerosis. The extract is derived from a plant in the carrot family that is commonly found in the Eastern Mediterranean. Some people take ammi visnaga orally and others use it topically to treat certain skin conditions.

When to sow: Autumn until spring
Where to sow: Direct sow
Depth to sow: 5mm
Aspect:  Full sun or as sunny a spot as possible.
Soil:  Prepared, well drained, fertilised soil.
Spacing:            Between plants: 15cm-20cm
Between rows: 30cm

Directions:  If growing for cut flowers make a shallow drill and place three or four seed 15cm apart, thinning to one seedling after germination. For a long flowering, garden subject plant a few seeds 20cm apart. After germination thin to one seedling.

Always consult a medical practitioner before embarking on any program. The information on this page is not diagnostic, therefore always consult a herbal practitioner or your GP in order to obtain a diagnosis. Never stop taking prescribed treatment without consulting your GP or a qualified herbal practitioner. Do not take without qualified medical advice.

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FOR THE HERBALISTS GARDEN! ANGELICA ARCHANGELICA IS A SWEET AND AMAZING HERBS WITH LUSH LEAVES AND AMAZING FLOWERS! Description Angelica makes an attractive backdrop for other plants. The flowers are small and numerous, yellowish or greenish, are grouped into large, globular umbels which bear pale yellow, oblong fruits. Together withSee more...

FOR THE HERBALISTS GARDEN! ANGELICA ARCHANGELICA IS A SWEET AND AMAZING HERBS WITH LUSH LEAVES AND AMAZING FLOWERS!

Description
Angelica makes an attractive backdrop for other plants. The flowers are small and numerous, yellowish or greenish, are grouped into large, globular umbels which bear pale yellow, oblong fruits. Together with its bright green leaves they are a pleasing contrast plant in the garden.

From the 10th century on, Angelica was cultivated as a vegetable and medicinal plant. Angelica is unique among the Umbelliferae for its pervading aromatic odour. The stems are both used as a vegetable and as a flavouring. Leaves are used as an herb for making teas or in salad. Its seeds are used as for flavouring liqueurs including absinthes, gin, aquavits, and bitters. Foods, desserts and confectionery are also flavoured with the seeds and it is also able to be turned into a jam. The hollow stems of Angelica archangelica may be eaten so the long bright-green stems are often candied or used as food decoration pieces.

There are about thirty varieties of Angelica, but Angelica archangelica is the only one officially employed in medicine. All parts of the plant have medicinal properties, and are used in the treatment of respiratory ailments, as well as an aid to digestion. Always consult a medical or herbal practitioner before embarking on any program of using a new medical herb. Some herbs should not be taken in certain situations, for example pregnancy, or for certain health conditions where adverse reactions may be possible. Alternatively, you may have allergies to an herb, or induce side effects from other medication and health conditions. So please do not take without qualified medical advice.

Grow Notes
Angelica grows only in well drained but damp soil, preferably near rivers or deposits of water so would be great in a pot or with its feet in your pond or water feature! Angelica grows to 2.4m in height. It can be susceptible to powdery mildew so water the roots not the leaves.

Sow
Start germination as soon as possible upon receiving as Angelica seeds have both a low germination rate and the seed is comparatively short lived. Plant direct in autumn or winter, or in spring after refrigeration has occurred. Keep the remaining seeds sealed in their packs, in the fridge as this will help to keep them viable.

The seeds should be placed into a fridge at 4°C for 30 days, then moved to the warmth of around 18°C for germination.

Plant in trays or pots containing a good quality seed compost. Barely cover the seeds as they need light to germinate. The seedlings should be transplanted when they have their first set of true leaves and are still small, plant into their final positions at about 1m apart.

Germination
30-35 days at 15-18°C. Seeds can be slow to germinate taking up to 6 months. Protect from aphids, slugs and snails.

Maturity
A hardy biennial plant, during its first year it grows only leaves as a leafy bush, but during its second year, its fluted stem can reach a height of 2.5 meters. It may die down to disappear completely from sight in winter, but it will reappear in spring. Self-seeding. Plants normally die after producing seed but the life of the plant can be extended 1 or more years if the flowers are removed before seeds are formed. Once established, Angelica can also be propagated by root division.

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SAID TO AID INDIGESTION, HEARTBURN , STOMACH ULCERS, HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE, CONSTIPATION AND MANY OTHER AILMENTS. IT'S A LARGE GROWING HERB USED AS FRESH LEAVES OR DRIED ROOT, STEM AND LEAF TO MAKE TEAS AND OTHER BEVERAGES. Extremely rare! This is a member of the carrot family and will sendSee more...

SAID TO AID INDIGESTION, HEARTBURN , STOMACH ULCERS, HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE, CONSTIPATION AND MANY OTHER AILMENTS. IT’S A LARGE GROWING HERB USED AS FRESH LEAVES OR DRIED ROOT, STEM AND LEAF TO MAKE TEAS AND OTHER BEVERAGES.

Extremely rare! This is a member of the carrot family and will send up a stem or small flowers and produce seeds each year. Harvesting a leaf at the break of day often results in a new sprout growing overnight, and being visible the following morning, hence the name “tomorrow’s leaf.”

Sow

Surface sow seeds in greenhouse/indoors in moist medium barely covering with soil. Press seeds into soil and keep moist until germination in about 15 days. The seedlings will take about 60 days before transplanting as they are slow-growing at first. Once in the ground they are fast-growing and will produce a large and attractive plant.

Germination
15 -25 days at 15-20°C

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CHECK OUT THIS FAMOUS CULINARY AND MEDICINAL HERB! Description Aniseed, Pimpinella anisum, also called Anise or rarely Anix, is a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae native to Eurasia. When anise reached England in the 14th century, demand was so high for its use as a spice, a medicine, andSee more...

CHECK OUT THIS FAMOUS CULINARY AND MEDICINAL HERB!

Description
Aniseed, Pimpinella anisum, also called Anise or rarely Anix, is a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae native to Eurasia. When anise reached England in the 14th century, demand was so high for its use as a spice, a medicine, and as a perfume, that King Edward I taxed it to pay for repairs on London Bridge! (From Epicgardening).

The flavour and aroma of its seeds have similarities with some other spices and herbs, such as star anise, fennel, liquorice, and tarragon. It is widely cultivated and used to flavour food, candy, and alcoholic drinks, especially around the Mediterranean. It is a key ingredient used to flavour some very famous liquors, including Ouzo in Greece and Cyprus, Pastis and Pernod in France, and Sambuca in Italy, as well as a common ingredient in cakes and bread. Evidence of anise cultivation goes back 4000 years to ancient Egypt, where it’s popularity quickly spread northwards to Europe leaving an aniseed flavour legacy everywhere it was grown.

The medicinal benefits of anise have been used for thousands of years to aid digestion, reduce flatulence, relieve coughs, sore throats, nausea and even to ease childbirth! Always consult a medical or herbal practitioner before embarking on any program of using a new medical herb. Some herbs should not be taken in certain situations, for example pregnancy, or for certain health conditions where adverse reactions may be possible. Alternatively, you may have allergies to an herb, or induce side effects from other medication and health conditions. So please do not take without qualified medical advice.

Grow Notes
An annual plant growing to 50cm in height, space them 30cm apart in full sun. They prefer moist but well-draining soil.

Sow
Start sowing aniseed in spring as soon as possible to provide enough warm, frost-free days to ensure seeds ripen in time for harvest. As with most carrot family plants, anise has a tap root that does not transplant well. For best results, sow anise directly into prepared drills in spring after the last frost date. Thin seedlings to 6-8 inches apart and 45cms between rows keeping the area watered and weed-free until plants are established.

Seeds can also be started indoors in early spring 6 – 8 weeks before the last frost, sowing directly into large peat/coir pots or pellets which help limit transplant shock and damage to the roots when planting in the ground. Aniseed seeds take 10-12 days to germinate at 20ºC. Seedlings will need to be hardened off gradually for around a week to acclimatize them to outdoor temperatures. Plant into their final positions when there is no longer any risk of frost.

Germination
6-14 days at 20-22°C

Maturity
130 days

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FROM The National Library of Medicine : An Overview on Ashwagandha: A Rasayana (Rejuvenator) of Ayurveda - PMC (nih.gov) Ashwagandha, scientifically termed Withania somnifera and belonging to the Solanaceae family, goes by the monikers "Indian Winter cherry" or "Indian Ginseng." Revered in Ayurveda, the traditional Indian system of medicine, forSee more...

FROM The National Library of Medicine : An Overview on Ashwagandha: A Rasayana (Rejuvenator) of Ayurveda – PMC (nih.gov)

Ashwagandha, scientifically termed Withania somnifera and belonging to the Solanaceae family, goes by the monikers “Indian Winter cherry” or “Indian Ginseng.” Revered in Ayurveda, the traditional Indian system of medicine, for millennia, it serves as a potent Rasayana, offering a spectrum of health benefits.

Rasayana, as described, denotes herbal or metallic formulations that foster a youthful state of physical and mental well-being, amplifying joy. Administered as tonics to children and embraced by individuals across all age groups, including the elderly, Rasayana herbs like Ashwagandha hold paramount importance in Ayurvedic practice, particularly recognized as a “Sattvic Kapha Rasayana” herb. Notably, many Rasayana herbs exhibit adaptogenic qualities, serving as anti-stress agents.

Ashwagandha commonly manifests as churna—a finely sieved powder—easily blendable with water, ghee (clarified butter), or honey. Its benefits span various realms:

  • Enhancing brain and nervous system function while augmenting memory.
  • Supporting a healthy balance within the reproductive system, fostering vitality in sexual and reproductive aspects.
  • As a potent adaptogen, fortifying the body’s resilience against stressors.
  • Bolstering the body’s defense mechanisms by enhancing cell-mediated immunity.
  • Exhibiting robust antioxidant properties, shielding against cellular damage induced by free radicals.

In essence, Ashwagandha stands as a cornerstone in Ayurvedic tradition, celebrated for its multifaceted health-promoting attributes, making it a cherished remedy in the pursuit of holistic well-being.

Classical Uses of Ashwagandha

Ayurveda, the ancient Indian system of medicine dating back to 6000 BC according to Charak Samhita (1949), has long revered Ashwagandha as a Rasayana—a rejuvenating tonic—over the span of millennia. Renowned for its versatility, Ashwagandha’s root is esteemed for its manifold properties, including being tonic, aphrodisiac, narcotic, diuretic, anthelmintic, astringent, thermogenic, and stimulant. Its name, “Ashwagandha,” originates from its root’s horse-like odor (“ashwa”), believed to imbue the consumer with equine strength.

Traditionally, Ashwagandha finds application in various ailments such as emaciation in children (especially potent when consumed with milk), debility from old age, rheumatism, vata imbalances, leucoderma, constipation, insomnia, nervous breakdowns, and goiter. Moreover, its crushed root paste alleviates joint inflammation and is topically applied to carbuncles, ulcers, and painful swellings. Additionally, Ashwagandha, often in combination with other herbs, is administered for snake venom and scorpion stings, as well as addressing leucorrhoea, boils, pimples, colic, worms, and piles.

Nagori Ashwagandha is hailed as the supreme variety, with optimum benefits derived from fresh Ashwagandha powder. Its leaves possess bitterness and are recommended for fever and painful swellings, while its flowers offer astringent, depurative, diuretic, and aphrodisiac properties. The seeds, when combined with astringents and rock salt, serve as an anthelmintic, removing white spots from the cornea. Ashwagandharishta, a preparation derived from Ashwagandha, aids in hysteria, anxiety, memory loss, syncope, and acts as a stimulant while bolstering sperm count.

Scientific scrutiny corroborates Ashwagandha’s adaptogenic and anti-stress effects, likening it to Eleutherococcus senticosus (Siberian Ginseng) and Panax Ginseng (Chinese/Korean Ginseng), thus earning the epithet “Indian Ginseng.” Extensive animal studies have showcased its efficacy in enhancing stamina, thwarting stress-induced ailments like gastric ulcers and hepatotoxicity, and bolstering resistance to stressors. Clinical evidence underscores its potential in averting stress-related conditions like arteriosclerosis, premature aging, arthritis, diabetes, hypertension, and malignancy.

As with any herbal remedy, consulting a healthcare professional is prudent before commencing any regimen. The information provided here serves as a reference and does not substitute professional medical advice. Always seek guidance from a qualified herbal practitioner or medical practitioner before initiating any treatment or altering prescribed regimens.

Growing Ashwagandha From Seeds 

  1. Sow Ashwagandha seeds indoors in early spring to early summer. The seeds need a soil temperature of at least 21C to germinate, and the plants can take up to 180 days to reach maturity. Starting them in pots is the best way to ensure a long growing season.
  2. Fill a seed propagation tray or several plastic pots with organic, well-draining, nutrient-rich soil.
  3. Place the seeds in the pots, cover them with a thin layer of soil, and water them well.
  4. Keep the seed pots in a warm place but not in full sun.
  5. Ashwagandha seeds can take between 10 and 14 days to germinate. Make sure the soil is kept evenly moist until the seedlings emerge. You can gradually reduce watering when you start seeing seedlings but never let the soil dry out completely.
  6. You can transplant the young Ashwagandha plants into the garden soil when they are at least 10cms tall.
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Astragalus, also known as Astragalus membranaceus or Huang Qi is a perennial herb that has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries. Here's some information about how it grows, its uses, and precautions for use: Growing Astragalus: Plant Description: Astragalus is a member of the pea family and isSee more...

Astragalus, also known as Astragalus membranaceus or Huang Qi is a perennial herb that has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries. Here’s some information about how it grows, its uses, and precautions for use:

Growing Astragalus:

Plant Description: Astragalus is a member of the pea family and is characterized by its small, yellow flowers and hairy stems. It typically grows in the northern and eastern parts of China, Mongolia, and Korea.

Cultivation: Astragalus prefers well-drained soil and a sunny location. It’s a hardy plant that can withstand various soil conditions.

Propagation: Astragalus can be grown from seeds or propagated through root divisions. It has a deep taproot, so it’s important to plant it in a location where it can establish a strong root system.

Uses of Astragalus:

Traditional Medicine: In traditional Chinese medicine, astragalus is often used to support the immune system, promote energy, and improve overall vitality. It is considered an adaptogen, helping the body adapt to stress.

Immune Support: Astragalus is commonly used to support the immune system and prevent respiratory infections. It may have antiviral and antibacterial properties.

Adaptogenic Properties: The herb is believed to help the body adapt to various stressors, both physical and emotional, and support overall well-being.

Cardiovascular Health: Some studies suggest that astragalus may have cardiovascular benefits, including improving heart function and reducing inflammation.

Anti-Inflammatory: Astragalus is said to have anti-inflammatory properties and may be used to alleviate inflammation in the body.

Energy and Vitality: It is often used to combat fatigue and boost energy levels, making it a popular choice for individuals experiencing low energy or weakness.

Precautions and Who Should Avoid Astragalus:

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding: Pregnant and breastfeeding women are advised to avoid astragalus due to a lack of sufficient safety data.

Autoimmune Conditions: Individuals with autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus, should exercise caution when using astragalus. The herb may stimulate the immune system, potentially exacerbating autoimmune conditions.

Organ Transplants: Astragalus may interfere with immunosuppressive medications taken by individuals who have undergone organ transplants. It’s crucial to consult with a healthcare professional if considering the use of astragalus in such cases.

Allergic Reactions: Some people may experience allergic reactions to astragalus. If you have allergies to plants in the legume family (such as peanuts), you should exercise caution.

Always consult a medical practitioner before embarking on any program. The information on this page is not diagnostic, therefore always consult a herbal practitioner or your GP in order to obtain a diagnosis. Never stop taking prescribed treatment without consulting your GP or a qualified herbal practitioner. Do not take without qualified medical advice.

To grow Astragalus from seed, start by preparing a well-draining soil mix. Sow the seeds in a sunny location, pressing them lightly into the soil. Water the seeds regularly to keep the soil consistently moist. Once the seedlings have grown large enough, transplant them into a permanent location with well-draining soil. Provide adequate sunlight, and consider supporting the plants as they grow. Harvest the roots when the plant is mature, typically after two to three years of growth.

Grow Notes

Prepare your soil in advance making sure it is well-draining. It prefers a sand based soil. This plant is a perennial, in that it will grow consistently once planted so make sure you plant them in the right spot as they will be there for some time!

Growing Astragalus from seed takes a bit more time than other herbs but it is surely worth it!  The seeds require a minimum three week cold stratification period. Put your seeds (in the ziplock bag) into the fridge for three weeks on the normal shelf. Once this is complete, to further aid germination, soak the seeds in water for 24 hours or scarify the seed coat with fine grade sandpaper before sowing. Seeds can take as long as nine weeks to sprout but generally can sprout within 24 hours to 2 weeks.

Put your seeds into the fridge in mid to late winter. Then start your seeds in pots inside your house or in your greenhouse. Don’t transplant seedlings outside until they are able to withstand it (they need to be strong and stable) and gradually get them used to sunlight – put them in partial then full sun.

Germination
1-14 days at 18-35°C or up to 9 weeks (don’t throw your pots out!)

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THE AMAZING ROOT OF THE HOLY GHOST OR BAI ZHI IS AN ANCIENT CHINESE HERBAL MEDICINE AND COOKING HERB! IT’S USED FOR HEADACHES, NASAL CONGESTION AND HAY FEVER. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY. Description Angelica dahurica is also commonly known as Chinese Angelica, the Garden Angelica, Root of the Holy Ghost, and Wild Angelica,See more...

THE AMAZING ROOT OF THE HOLY GHOST OR BAI ZHI IS AN ANCIENT CHINESE HERBAL MEDICINE AND COOKING HERB! IT’S USED FOR HEADACHES, NASAL CONGESTION AND HAY FEVER. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY.

Description
Angelica dahurica is also commonly known as Chinese Angelica, the Garden Angelica, Root of the Holy Ghost, and Wild Angelica, as well as its Chinese name, Bai Zhi.

Bai Zhi is a wildly grown species of angelica native to Siberia, Russia Far East, Mongolia, North-eastern China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan. This species tends to grow near riverbanks, along streams and among rocky shrubs. The root of the plant is widely used for its medicinal properties and is known to contain furanocoumarins and angelicotoxin.

The medicinal properties of the Dahurican root have been dated back to Ancient China as early as 400 BC. Zhang Cong Zhen (1156–1228), a famous physician in the military, believed that diseases were caused by external evil factors, or pathogens, that entered the human body. He listed Bai Zhi as an herb that purges the body of any negative influences such as heat, clamminess, dryness, and cold on the skin. Today, the roots are used for other numerous treatments of illnesses such as headaches, relieving nasal obstruction, detoxification of the blood, as a pain reliever, an anti-inflammatory, a laxative, sedative, anti-fungal cream for skin, as well as treating swollen gums and toothaches.

The plant is very aromatic, so the stalks of this plant have also been commonly used as a food ingredient or have been made into decorative items. The seeds are often used as a seasoning condiment in food as well as a source of flavouring in liqueur. Another popular usage for this herb is its use in cosmetic products.

Always consult a medical or herbal practitioner before embarking on any program of using a new medical herb. Some herbs should not be taken in certain situations, for example pregnancy, or for certain health conditions where adverse reactions may be possible. Alternatively, you may have allergies to an herb, or induce side effects from other medication and health conditions. So please do not take without qualified medical advice.

Grow Notes
Self-fertile, it blooms in the summer with many large white flower heads which are pollinated by insects. They can be grown under semi-shade or full-shaded conditions, and prefer moist, rich soils. Can be grown in containers. Growing to 1-2mtall. The plant usually has a brown cylindrical root that grows approximately 2–5 cm thick.

All parts of the plant are edible. The leaves should be harvested carefully the first year so as not to damage the main stem. The root is harvested in the fall of the first year or in the spring of the second year.

Sow
Seed requires light to germinate, along with alternating temperatures of cold and warmth, so place in fridge prior to sowing in Spring, or sow in Autumn for winter chilling, when the soil warms up, they will germinate. Select soil with good water retention and organic matter.

When planting, the row spacing of plants should be between 15 and 20 cm and should not be too close.

Germination
You can expect germination in 3 to 4 weeks if planted in Spring after being in a fridge, otherwise as the soil warms up after winter they will pop up.

Maturity
This is an herbaceous perennial plant, so it should grow back naturally on its own, year after year. However, it is to be noted that this is more reliable if it is prevented from setting seed by cutting off the flower before they bloom in full. Once established, Angelica can also be propagated by root division.

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Mrs Burns Lemon basil (Ocimum basilicum var. citriodorum) is a delightful herb that adds a unique citrusy flavour to dishes. Mrs Burns is a larger leaved basil, it has more in common with sweet basil than lemon basil and has an intense lemon and lime flavour. It has scented leavesSee more...

Mrs Burns Lemon basil (Ocimum basilicum var. citriodorum) is a delightful herb that adds a unique citrusy flavour to dishes. Mrs Burns is a larger leaved basil, it has more in common with sweet basil than lemon basil and has an intense lemon and lime flavour. It has scented leaves and lovely pink flowers and is as ornamental as it is useful!

Here’s a brief overview of how to grow and cook with lemon basil:

Remember, the best time to use lemon basil is when the leaves are young and haven’t flowered, as this is when they are most flavorful. Pick them in the early morning after the dew has dried. This is when they are at their height as far as flavour goes. Experiment with different recipes to fully enjoy the unique taste that Mrs Burns lemon basil brings to your culinary creations.

Cooking with Lemon Basil:

  1. Flavour Pairings: Lemon basil complements a variety of dishes, especially those with a Mediterranean or Southeast Asian influence. It pairs well with tomatoes, garlic, ginger, lemongrass, fish, chicken, and vegetables.
  2. Fresh Use: Add fresh lemon basil leaves to salads, sandwiches, or wraps for a burst of citrus flavor. You can also use it as a garnish for soups and stews.
  3. Pesto: Make a lemon basil pesto by blending fresh lemon basil leaves with garlic, pine nuts, Parmesan cheese, and olive oil. Use it as a pasta sauce, sandwich spread, or dip.
  4. Infused Oils and Vinegar: Create infused oils or vinegar by steeping lemon basil leaves in olive oil or vinegar. These can be used in dressings, marinades, or drizzled over dishes.
  5. Tea: Steep fresh or dried lemon basil leaves in hot water to make a refreshing herbal tea. It’s soothing and aromatic.
  6. Grilled Dishes: Use lemon basil to flavor grilled meats, fish, or vegetables. The citrusy notes add a bright and summery touch to grilled dishes.

 

Grow Notes
Annual growing to 80cm tall, grow in part or full sun in moist well drained soils.

Frequent and consistent watering will result in lush, green growth from plants without the need for frequent fertilization. At harvest time, make certain only to remove about one-fourth of the plant to ensure continued basil harvests throughout the season.

Sow
Spring and Summer planting. Start basil seeds in seed trays at 2mm depth and keep soil moist but not wet till germination. Or plant direct, 40cm apart at 2mm depth.

Germination
5-10 days at 18-35°C

Maturity
70 days to maturity. Annual.

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ONE OF THE BEST OF THE LETTUCE LEAF BASILS, A WONDERFUL COOL GREEN COLOUR, VERY EXOTIC AND TROPICAL LOOKING AND WITH A SUPERB SWEET TASTE! Description Sweet Mammoth Basil is a desirable tender-leafed basil with leaves as big as your hand! With ruffled, jagged leaves, Sweet Mammoth has a sweetSee more...

ONE OF THE BEST OF THE LETTUCE LEAF BASILS, A WONDERFUL COOL GREEN COLOUR, VERY EXOTIC AND TROPICAL LOOKING AND WITH A SUPERB SWEET TASTE!

Description
Sweet Mammoth Basil is a desirable tender-leafed basil with leaves as big as your hand! With ruffled, jagged leaves, Sweet Mammoth has a sweet flavour that’s perfect for sauces, pesto salads and even fresh on a sandwich. Basil Sweet Mammoth produces tender crisp leaves with a Genovese-like aroma and flavour.

Try growing this basil on a sunny windowsill – it loves filtered light. Removing flowers from basil encourages maximum growth and the best leaf production. Pick before flowering for the best flavour. Very ornamental too – looks great on the patio!

Grow Notes
Annual growing to 30-50cm tall, grow in part or full sun in moist well drained soils.

Frequent and consistent watering will result in lush, green growth from plants without the need for frequent fertilization. At harvest time, make certain only to remove about one-fourth of the plant to ensure continued basil harvests throughout the season.

Sow
Spring and Summer planting. Start basil seeds in seed trays at 2mm depth and keep soil moist but not wet till germination. Or plant direct, 40cm apart at 2mm depth.

Germination
5-10 days at 18-35°C

Maturity
50- 60 days to maturity. Annual.

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Description From Wikipedia: The soybean, soy bean, or soya bean (Glycine max)[3] is a species of legume native to East Asia, widely grown for its edible bean, which has numerous uses. Traditional unfermented food uses of soybeans include soy milk, from which tofu and tofu skin are made. Fermented soySee more...

Description
From Wikipedia: The soybean, soy bean, or soya bean (Glycine max)[3] is a species of legume native to East Asia, widely grown for its edible bean, which has numerous uses.

Traditional unfermented food uses of soybeans include soy milk, from which tofu and tofu skin are made. Fermented soy foods include soy sauce, fermented bean paste, natt, and tempeh. Fat-free (defatted) soybean meal is a significant and cheap source of protein for animal feeds and many packaged meals. For example, soybean products, such as textured vegetable protein (TVP), are ingredients in many meat and dairy substitutes.[4]

Soy beans contain significant amounts of phytic acid, dietary minerals and B vitamins. Soy vegetable oil, used in food and industrial applications, is another product of processing the soybean crop. Soybean is the most important protein source for feed farm animals (that in turn yields animal protein for human consumption).[5]

From Healthline Website:

Soybeans are mainly composed of protein but also contain good amounts of carbs and fat.

The nutrition facts for 3.5 ounces (100 grams) of boiled soybeans are (1Trusted Source):

Calories: 173
Water: 63%
Protein: 16.6 grams
Carbs: 9.9 grams
Sugar: 3 grams
Fibre: 6 grams
Fat: 9 grams
Saturated: 1.3 grams
Monounsaturated: 1.98 grams
Polyunsaturated: 5.06 grams
Omega-3: 0.6 grams
Omega-6: 4.47 g
Protein
Soybeans are among the best sources of plant-based protein.

The protein content of soybeans is 36–56% of the dry weight (2Trusted Source, 3Trusted Source, 4Trusted Source).

One cup (172 grams) of boiled soybeans boasts around 29 grams of protein (5Trusted Source).

The nutritional value of soy protein is good, although the quality is not quite as high as animal protein (6Trusted Source).

The main types of protein in soybeans are glycinin and conglycinin, which make up approximately 80% of the total protein content. These proteins may trigger allergic reactions in some people (4Trusted Source, 7Trusted Source).

Consumption of soy protein has been linked with a modest decrease in cholesterol levels (8Trusted Source, 9Trusted Source, 10Trusted Source).

Fat
Soybeans are classified as oilseeds and used to make soybean oil.

The fat content is approximately 18% of the dry weight — mainly polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, with small amounts of saturated fat (11Trusted Source).

The predominant type of fat in soybeans is linoleic acid, accounting for approximately 50% of the total fat content.

Carbs
Being low in carbs, whole soybeans are very low on the glycaemic index (GI), which is a measure of how foods affect the rise in blood sugar after a meal (12).

This low GI makes soybeans suitable for people with diabetes.

Fibre
Soybeans contain a fair amount of both soluble and insoluble fibre.

The insoluble fibres are mainly alpha-galactosides, which may cause flatulence and diarrhoea in sensitive individuals (13Trusted Source, 14Trusted Source).

Alpha-galactosides belong to a class of fibres called FODMAPs, which may exacerbate the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) (15Trusted Source).

Despite causing unpleasant side effects in some people, soluble fibres in soybeans are generally considered healthy.

They are fermented by bacteria in your colon, leading to the formation of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which may improve gut health and reduce your risk of colon cancer (16Trusted Source, 17Trusted Source).

SUMMARY
Soybeans are a very rich source of plant-based protein and fat. What’s more, their high fibre content is good for your gut health.

Grow Notes
Plant in late Spring/Summer. Soybeans need a long, hot growing season to thrive, and they don’t like frost.

Sow directly into a rich soil and keep mulched to improve water retention. When sowing do not allow soil to get too wet as beans can rot.

Sow
Sow direct at 20mm depth spaced 15cm apart in Spring after chances of frost have passed. Rows should be spaced 50cm apart and be in full sun, with well-drained soil.

Keep soil moist but never wet or dry.

Germination
7-14 days at 25-30°C

Maturity
85 days to maturity, Frost tender Annual plant.

“Soya Beans isolated above the white background” by wuestenigel on Creative commons.

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PARTY ON DOWN WITH THE SPECIAL INSECTS AND WILDLIFE THAT CALL YOUR GARDEN HOME! Description You can grow over 50 different varieties that you can eat too! This is a great way to get dozens of different plants! Attract bees, birds and beneficial insects to pollinate and clear your gardenSee more...

PARTY ON DOWN WITH THE SPECIAL INSECTS AND WILDLIFE THAT CALL YOUR GARDEN HOME!

Description
You can grow over 50 different varieties that you can eat too! This is a great way to get dozens of different plants!

Attract bees, birds and beneficial insects to pollinate and clear your garden of annoying pests naturally!

Bee mix can include all these plants (plus more!) so you can also get a good garden out of this mix! Alyssum, Basil, Borage, Buckwheat, Calendula, Caraway, Coriander, Cosmos, Dill, Gypsophila, Lucerne, Marigolds, Radish, Schizanthus, Californian Poppy and other Poppies, Coreopsis,  Phacelia,  Rudbeckia, Sunflowers.

300+ Seeds.

Grow Notes
Natural plantings for beds or field areas. Plant in late spring or early summer in full to part sun. Average, well-draining soils recommended.

Sow
Direct seed sowing recommended. Weed area, then broadcast seed, rake area lightly and water in to ensure good seed to soil contact.

Keep area moist to aid germination.

Germination
10-30 days at 18-25°C

Maturity
Varies. Mix of Perennials and Annuals

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Long trailing vines with dusty purple coloured berries are a feature of the delicious Boysenberry (Rubus ursinus x idaeus). Thought to be a hybrid between Thornless Blackberry, American Dewberry, Loganberry and Raspberry, the fruit is aromatic. They are packed with health-promoting antioxidants and important nutrients, including fibre, folate, vitamin KSee more...

Long trailing vines with dusty purple coloured berries are a feature of the delicious Boysenberry (Rubus ursinus x idaeus). Thought to be a hybrid between Thornless Blackberry, American Dewberry, Loganberry and Raspberry, the fruit is aromatic.

They are packed with health-promoting antioxidants and important nutrients, including fibre, folate, vitamin K and vitamin C.

Finding them fresh is difficult so grow your own!

Boysenberry nutrition is a good source of fibre and micronutrients, including manganese, folate, vitamin K and vitamin C. It contains powerful antioxidants, including flavonoids that help prevent oxidative damage to the body.

Boysenberry seeds can grow successful and prolifically fruiting plants. However as the Boysenberry is a hybrid between three varieties, not every seed will produce the exact same plant or fruit. Growing from seed is a way to get an interesting range of fruit flavours! Grow all your seeds and pick the most tasty one to propagate from!

One cup (about 132 grams) of frozen boysenberries contains approximately:

66 calories
16.1 grams carbohydrates
1.5 grams protein
0.3 grams fat
7 grams fiber
0.7 milligrams manganese (36 percent DV)
83.1 micrograms folate (21 percent DV)
10.3 micrograms vitamin K (13 percent DV)
4.1 milligrams vitamin C (7 percent DV)
1.1 milligrams vitamin E (6 percent DV)
1.1 milligrams iron (6 percent DV)
21.1 milligrams magnesium (5 percent DV)
0.1 milligrams thiamine (5 percent DV)
1 milligram niacin (5 percent DV)
183 milligrams potassium (5 percent DV)
0.1 milligrams copper (5 percent DV)
0.1 milligrams vitamin B6 (4 percent DV)
35.6 milligrams calcium (4 percent DV)
35.6 milligrams phosphorus (4 percent DV)
Benefits
The health benefits of boysenberry come from the fruit’s impressive nutrition content, which includes beneficial polyphenols and micronutrients.

1. Promotes Lung Health
A 2016 study conducted on mice published in the American Journal of Physiology evaluated the lung function benefits from increased consumption of fruits high in polyphenols. Researchers found that regular boysenberry consumption has the potential to moderate chronic lung fibrosis in asthma and other chronic pulmonary diseases.

A 2021 study published in Food Science and Nutrition found that drinking boysenberry and apple juice concentrate promoted a shift toward an anti-inflammatory environment within the lungs, and it reduced immune cell infiltration and tissue damage.

2. Supports Cardiovascular Health
A 2014 study found that polyphenol content in boysenberry juice decreased diastolic blood pressure after four weeks. The results also suggest that the nutrients found in the fruit improve endothelial function, which allows for the flow of substances and fluid in and out of tissue.

Another study suggests that the anthocyanins in boysenberry inhibit endothelial dysfunction and contribute to the maintenance of healthy artery homeostasis.

3. Provides Antioxidants
Boysenberry is rich in antioxidants, including flavonoids like anthocyanins. Anthocyanins have been shown in studies to prevent diseases associated with oxidative stress, including cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. The flavonoids also benefit gut health by promoting a healthy balance of bacteria.

A 2015 study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that boysenberry seed oil had the strongest oxygen radical absorbance capacity compared to red raspberry, blueberry and marionberry seed oils.

4. Good Source of Fibre
The dietary fibre found in berries like boysenberry have a positive impact on cardiovascular health, digestive health and more. High-fibre foods promote regularity and enhance digestive health, while helping to stabilize blood sugar levels and improve heart health by decreasing LDL cholesterol and promoting blood flow.

5. Provides Vitamin K
Vitamin K foods promote blood sugar control, strong bones and better brain function. A cup of boysenberries contains about 13 percent of your daily value of vitamin K, making it a good source of the important micronutrient.

Data shows that vitamin K deficiency is not uncommon, so getting enough of the nutrient in your daily foods is necessary.

The taste of boysenberry has been likened to that of blackberries but with an extra tang and sweetness. They are thin-skinned and juicy when ripe, a bit bigger than your standard blackberries.

The downside of these unique berries is that they only last a few days after picking, so it’s difficult for commercial growers to get them in grocery stores. For that reason, you’re more likely to see them frozen or canned, but you also have the option of growing your own at home.

The first year, only leaves are produced during the summer. The next season, the berries grow on the plant’s green stems.

Wait until the berries are a dark purple colour and easy to pull off the stem.

Once you have your hands on some boysenberries, it’s time to eat them raw or use them in recipes. Because the fresh berries only last a few days, you may choose to freeze them after harvest.

Simply wash them, lay them out on a baking sheet and put them in the freezer. Once they’re frozen, add them to an airtight bag or container.

Now you can use them in smoothies, a boysenberry pie or tart, or berry-based baked goods.

Any recipe that calls for blackberries or raspberries also works well with boysenberry.

Risks and Side Effects
Some people may experience mild allergic reactions after consuming boysenberry. If you have swelling; itching of the mouth, lips or hands; or stomach discomfort after eating these berries, discontinue use immediately.

People susceptible to kidney stones should minimize their consumption of berries and some other fruits because the oxalates may increase the production of stones.

Grow Notes
Grow in full or part sun. Canes will grow to 2m high and wide, and will spread over the years if not contained within a trellis with yearly pruning. Remove old dead canes in winter, leaving only vigorous healthy canes to produce the next crop.

Plants prefer a rich, well-draining soil, with a pH of 6.0-7.0.

Sow
To plant Boysenberries from seed, sow the seeds in a pot starting in mid-winter. Push the seeds about an inch deep and an inch apart into the soil. Cover with a thin layer of sand.

Store the pot in a dim and cool place indoors, such as a pantry or even a garage, and keep the seeds moist by spraying with a spray bottle as needed.

Once temperatures reach above 15°C, place your raspberry pot outdoors.

Once they’ve started to develop leaves and have grown about one inch in height, transplant them in a big pot or in the garden and cover the base around the plant with mulch, leaving the trunk bare to keep the soil nice and moist.

Germination
10-40 days

Maturity
Perennial with fruit on 2 year old canes.

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SUPER CHEAP! A GREAT COVER CROP TO ADD ENERGY AND NUTRIENTS TO YOUR SOIL! GREEN MANURE IS ONE OF THE BEST THINGS FOR ADDING GOODNESS TO THE SOIL! PLUS IT AERATES AND ENCOURAGES WORMS! PLANT NOW AND THE FLOWERS BRING BEES AND POLLINATORS TO YOUR WINTER CROPS TOO! Buckwheat (FagopyrumSee more...

SUPER CHEAP! A GREAT COVER CROP TO ADD ENERGY AND NUTRIENTS TO YOUR SOIL! GREEN MANURE IS ONE OF THE BEST THINGS FOR ADDING GOODNESS TO THE SOIL! PLUS IT AERATES AND ENCOURAGES WORMS! PLANT NOW AND THE FLOWERS BRING BEES AND POLLINATORS TO YOUR WINTER CROPS TOO!

Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum), or common buckwheat, is a plant cultivated for its grain-like seeds and as a cover crop. Despite the name, buckwheat is not closely related to wheat, as it is not a grass. Instead, buckwheat is related to sorrel, knotweed, and rhubarb.

Buckwheat is referred to as a pseudocereal because its seeds’ culinary use is the same as cereals’, owing to their composition of complex carbohydrates.

Buckwheat was one of the earliest crops introduced by Europeans to North America. Dispersal around the globe was complete by 2006, when a variety developed in Canada was widely planted in China.

In India, buckwheat flour is known as kuttu ka atta and is culturally associated with the Navaratri festival. On the day of this festival, food items made only from buckwheat are consumed.

OUR REGULAR SEED PACKET FULL OF TRIANGULAR SEEDS, FERTILE AND FRESH!

Grow Notes
Buckwheat is a short-season crop that grows well in low-fertility soils; too much fertilizer – especially nitrogen – reduces yields, and the soil must be well drained. Plant in Spring and Summer, however in hot climates it can be grown only by sowing late in the Summer season, so that it blooms in cooler weather.

The presence of pollinators greatly increases yield and nectar from flowering buckwheat produces a dark-coloured honey.

If growing as a green manure crop, once the plants are approaching flowering, then cut or slash and dig into the soil to decompose.

Sow
Prepare soil for sowing by weeding and cultivating soil. Sow direct at a depth of 5-10mm at a rate of 100g to 100 square metres. This can be achieved by scattering over the soil surface and then raking and watering in or covering with a layer of soil.

Germination
4-12 days at 20- 26°C

Maturity
70- 100 days depending on use as cover crop, green manure or harvesting for seed.

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SUPER CHEAP TODAY! A GREAT COVER CROP TO ADD ENERGY AND NUTRIENTS TO YOUR SOIL! GREEN MANURE IS ONE OF THE BEST THINGS FOR ADDING GOODNESS TO THE SOIL! PLUS IT AERATES AND ENCOURAGES WORMS! PLANT NOW AND THE FLOWERS BRING BEES AND POLLINATORS TO YOUR WINTER CROPS TOO! BuckwheatSee more...

SUPER CHEAP TODAY! A GREAT COVER CROP TO ADD ENERGY AND NUTRIENTS TO YOUR SOIL! GREEN MANURE IS ONE OF THE BEST THINGS FOR ADDING GOODNESS TO THE SOIL! PLUS IT AERATES AND ENCOURAGES WORMS! PLANT NOW AND THE FLOWERS BRING BEES AND POLLINATORS TO YOUR WINTER CROPS TOO!

Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum), or common buckwheat, is a plant cultivated for its grain-like seeds and as a cover crop. Despite the name, buckwheat is not closely related to wheat, as it is not a grass. Instead, buckwheat is related to sorrel, knotweed, and rhubarb.

Buckwheat is referred to as a pseudocereal because its seeds’ culinary use is the same as cereals’, owing to their composition of complex carbohydrates.

Buckwheat was one of the earliest crops introduced by Europeans to North America. Dispersal around the globe was complete by 2006, when a variety developed in Canada was widely planted in China.

In India, buckwheat flour is known as kuttu ka atta and is culturally associated with the Navaratri festival. On the day of this festival, food items made only from buckwheat are consumed.

Buckwheat is a short-season crop that grows well in low-fertility soils; too much fertilizer – especially nitrogen – reduces yields, and the soil must be well drained. In hot climates buckwheat can be grown only by sowing late in the season, so that it blooms in cooler weather.

The presence of pollinators greatly increases yield and nectar from flowering buckwheat produces a dark-coloured honey.

OUR REGULAR SEED PACKET FULL OF TRIANGULAR SEEDS, FERTILE AND FRESH!

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THE AMAZING BUTTERFLY CLITORIA PEA! COLOURS DRINKS, FIXES POOR SOILS TO MAKE NUTRIENTS AVAILABLE TO PLANTS! CAN BE EATEN AND USED AS A MEDICINE! THREE TIMES AS MANY SEEDS! AMAZING! PLUS IT LOOKS AMAZING ON A FENCE, IN A HANGING BASKET, ON A WALL OR AS A GROUNDCOVER! Description ClitoriaSee more...

THE AMAZING BUTTERFLY CLITORIA PEA! COLOURS DRINKS, FIXES POOR SOILS TO MAKE NUTRIENTS AVAILABLE TO PLANTS! CAN BE EATEN AND USED AS A MEDICINE! THREE TIMES AS MANY SEEDS! AMAZING! PLUS IT LOOKS AMAZING ON A FENCE, IN A HANGING BASKET, ON A WALL OR AS A GROUNDCOVER!

Description
Clitoria ternatea, commonly known as Asian pigeonwings, blue bell vine, blue pea, butterfly pea, cordofan pea is a plant species belonging to the Fabaceae family. The flowers of this vine were imagined to have the shape of human female genitals, hence the Latin name of the genus “Clitoria”, from “clitoris”.

People: make tea from purple pea flowers, broth from leaves, add fresh green leaves to stews and soups.

FROM WIKIPEDIA:

The most striking feature about this plant is the colour of its flowers, a vivid deep blue; solitary, with light yellow markings. They are about 4 cm (1.6 in) long by 3 cm (1.2 in) wide. Some varieties yield white flowers.

The fruits are 5–7 cm (2.0–2.8 in) long, flat pods with six to ten seeds in each pod. They are edible when tender.

It is grown as an ornamental plant and as a revegetation species (e.g., in coal mines in Australia), requiring little care when cultivated. As a legume, its roots form a symbiotic association with soil bacteria known as rhizobia, which transform atmospheric N2 into a plant-usable form (a process called nitrogen fixing), therefore, this plant is also used to improve soil quality through the decomposition of nitrogen rich plant material.

In Southeast Asia, the flower is used as a natural food colouring. Known as bunga telang,[4] in Malay cooking, an aqueous extract is used to colour glutinous rice for kuih ketan (also known as pulut tai tai or pulut tekan in Peranakan/Nyonya cooking) and in nyonya chang.

In Kelantan, east part of Malaysia, by adding a few buds of this flower in a pot while cooking white rice will add bluish tint on the rice which is served with other side dishes and such meal is called nasi kerabu.

In Thailand, a syrupy blue drink is made called nam dok anchan, it is sometimes consumed with a drop of sweet lime juice to increase acidity and turn the juice into pink-purple. In Burmese and Thai cuisines, the flowers are also dipped in batter and fried.

Butterfly pea flower tea is made from the ternatea flowers and dried lemongrass and changes color depending on what is added to the liquid, with lemon juice turning it purple.[5]

The flowers have more recently been used as a botanical in a colour-changing gin. Blue in the bottle, this turns pink when mixed with a carbonated mixer such as tonic water.[6]

Traditional medicine:

In traditional Ayurvedic medicine, it is ascribed various qualities including memory enhancing, nootropic, antistress, anxiolytic, antidepressant, anticonvulsant, tranquilizing, and sedative properties.[7] In traditional Chinese medicine, the plant has been ascribed properties affecting female libido due to its similar appearance to the female reproductive organ.[8]

Chemical constituents:

Chemical compounds isolated from C. ternatea include various triterpenoids, flavonol glycosides, anthocyanins and steroids.[7] Cyclic peptides known as cliotides have been isolated from the heat-stable fraction of C. ternatea extract.

A traditional Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine, Clitoria Ternatea has been consumed for centuries as a memory enhancer, brain booster, anti-stress and calmative agent.

Always consult a medical practitioner before embarking on any program. The information on this page is not diagnostic, therefore always consult a herbal practitioner or your GP in order to obtain a diagnosis.
Never stop taking prescribed treatment without consulting your GP or a qualified herbal practitioner. Do not take without qualified medical advice.

SEEDS ARE LARGE, EASY TO SEE AND HANDLE.

Grow Notes
Grows as a vine or creeper, doing well in moist, neutral soils. Support or trellis is recommended.

Sow
Plant in Spring through to Summer.

Raise as seedlings or sow direct at a depth of 20mm, with 50cm between plants and 100cm between rows.

Keep soil moist but not wet until germination.

Germination
7-14 days at 20-30°C.

Maturity
90 days. Frost tender Perennial which is grown as an annual in cool climates. Regrows annually from last season’s fallen seeds when conditions are favourable or to be sure collect seeds from your best seed pods.

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BRAND NEW! CALENDULA FIESTA GITANA CREATES A STUNNING EFFECT IN YOUR GARDEN! A DWARF HABIT WITH BIG FLOWERS! THE FLOWERS ARE NOT ONLY BEAUTIFUL BUT CAN BE USED AS A GARNISH AND AS HERBAL MEDICINE! Description The Fiesta Gitana is a compact plant producing double flowers in a richly colouredSee more...

BRAND NEW! CALENDULA FIESTA GITANA CREATES A STUNNING EFFECT IN YOUR GARDEN! A DWARF HABIT WITH BIG FLOWERS! THE FLOWERS ARE NOT ONLY BEAUTIFUL BUT CAN BE USED AS A GARNISH AND AS HERBAL MEDICINE!

Description
The Fiesta Gitana is a compact plant producing double flowers in a richly coloured mixture. Easy to grow – ideal for beginners. The brightly coloured flowers are cheerful in borders whatever the weather. Award of Garden Merit. Drought resistant. Calendula flowers are edible and ideal in salads.

Attracts Bees, Attracts Butterflies, Attracts Pollinators, Easy to Grow & Maintain, Edible, Extended Bloom Time, Fragrant

Calendula is a traditional cottage garden flower and culinary herb, which has recently become a popular choice for bedding displays.

Calendula is known for attracting bees, beneficial insects and other pollinators. It has pollen rich flowers.

Calendula is a bright and cheery plant! It is native to the Canary Islands, South and Central Europe, and North Africa.

Calendula deters asparagus beetles and tomato hornworms making them a good companion planting for tomatoes.

Grow Notes
Plant in full or part sun in a well-drained soil for them to thrive. They are tolerant of poor soil and will bloom satisfactorily in all conditions except deep shade and extreme heat.

Self-seeding plant that drops seeds onto the soil at the end of the season so choose a semi-permanent position or deadhead plants before they can drop seed or to prolong flowering.

Sow
Plant 15mm deep and 30cm apart in Spring and Autumn, sown direct or raise as seedlings in good quality potting mix.

Keep soil moist, not wet or dry.

Germination
10- 14 days at 20-22°C

Maturity
60-70 days. Annual that will regrow every year if left to go to seed.

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HERBALIST’S GARDEN - FLOWERS WITH THE NEW MOON!!! A HERBAL AND EDIBLE FLOWER! USE IN PLACE OF SAFFRON, SPICY AND TANGY FLAVOUR, THE MOST EXQUISITE CALENDULA FLOWER EVER – LOTS OF COLOURS - BIG FLOWERS WITH A STUNNING COLOUR! DROUGHT TOLERANT! GREAT TO BRIGHTEN UP SALADS AND TO PILE ONSee more...

HERBALIST’S GARDEN – FLOWERS WITH THE NEW MOON!!! A HERBAL AND EDIBLE FLOWER! USE IN PLACE OF SAFFRON, SPICY AND TANGY FLAVOUR, THE MOST EXQUISITE CALENDULA FLOWER EVER – LOTS OF COLOURS – BIG FLOWERS WITH A STUNNING COLOUR! DROUGHT TOLERANT! GREAT TO BRIGHTEN UP SALADS AND TO PILE ON TOP OF CAKES FOR A BURST OF COLOUR!

CALENDULA – A GREAT HERBAL AND TOTALLY SPECTACULAR!

Description
The calendula is an annual flower native to the northern Mediterranean countries. Its name refers to its tendency to bloom with the calendar, usually once a month with every new moon. The term “marigold” refers to the Virgin Mary, and the flowers are used to honour her during Catholic events.

The Egyptians considered them to have rejuvenating properties. In the Hindu world, the flowers were used to adorn statues of gods in their temples, as well as a colorant in food, fabrics, and cosmetics, and of particular interest, in the 18th and 19th century calendula was used to colour cheese.

Calendula has historically been used as a food, adding flavour to cereals, rice, and soups. The petals can be added to salads for their brilliant colour. As recently as 70 years ago, American physicians used calendula to treat amenorrhea, conjunctivitis, fevers, cuts, scrapes, bruises, and burns, as well as minor infections.

This old-fashioned flower has a long history as both an ornamental garden plant and as an herb. When dried, the petals of Calendula flowers provide a culinary substitute for saffron; in times past, they were used to give a rich colour to cheese or butter.

Medicinal uses included treatments for measles and smallpox, as well as for dressing wounds on the battlefield. As well as being the traditional flower for October birthdays, calendula symbolizes sorrow and sympathy.

Pacific Beauty Mix Calendula Germination: Direct sow in spring, planting ¼” below the surface. To start seed in pots, plant ¼” deep in individual pots or a flat; keep evenly moist and at a temperature of 15-20 degrees until germination, which should take place within 5-10 days.

If deadheaded regularly, it will produce profuse blossoms all season long; in hotter regions, it may stop blooming in the heat of summer and begin again in autumn. This plant will readily reseed itself. Calendula can also be grown in containers.

Harvesting Calendula: For fresh flowers, cut the stems long and place them in water immediately. For culinary use, cut flower heads that have just opened; spread them out away from direct sunlight to dry completely, turning them occasionally. When the flowers are crisp and dry, store them in an airtight container for up to a year. The dried petals can be used in place of saffron, or as a garnish to add colour and spice to dishes.

EASY TO SEE AND HANDLE SEEDS.

Grow Notes
Plant in full or part sun in a well-drained soil for them to thrive. They are tolerant of poor soil and will bloom satisfactorily in all conditions except deep shade and extreme heat.

Self-seeding plant that drops seeds onto the soil at the end of the season so choose a semi-permanent position or deadhead plants before they can drop seed or to prolong flowering.

Sow
Plant 15mm deep and 50cm apart in Spring and Autumn, sown direct or raise as seedlings in good quality potting mix.

Keep soil moist, not wet or dry.

Germination
7- 14 days at 20-22°C

Maturity
70 -80 days. Annual that will regrow every year if left to go to seed.

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HERBALIST’S GARDEN - FLOWERS WITH THE NEW MOON!!! A HERBAL AND EDIBLE FLOWER! USE IN PLACE OF SAFFRON, SPICY AND TANGY FLAVOUR, THE MOST EXQUISITE CALENDULA FLOWER EVER – LOTS OF COLOURS - BIG FLOWERS WITH A STUNNING COLOUR! DROUGHT TOLERANT! GREAT TO BRIGHTEN UP SALADS AND TO PILE ONSee more...

HERBALIST’S GARDEN – FLOWERS WITH THE NEW MOON!!! A HERBAL AND EDIBLE FLOWER! USE IN PLACE OF SAFFRON, SPICY AND TANGY FLAVOUR, THE MOST EXQUISITE CALENDULA FLOWER EVER – LOTS OF COLOURS – BIG FLOWERS WITH A STUNNING COLOUR! DROUGHT TOLERANT! GREAT TO BRIGHTEN UP SALADS AND TO PILE ON TOP OF CAKES FOR A BURST OF COLOUR!

CALENDULA – A GREAT HERBAL AND TOTALLY SPECTACULAR!

Description
The calendula is an annual flower native to the northern Mediterranean countries. Its name refers to its tendency to bloom with the calendar, usually once a month with every new moon. The term “marigold” refers to the Virgin Mary, and the flowers are used to honour her during Catholic events.

The Egyptians considered them to have rejuvenating properties. In the Hindu world, the flowers were used to adorn statues of gods in their temples, as well as a colorant in food, fabrics, and cosmetics, and of particular interest, in the 18th and 19th century calendula was used to colour cheese.

Calendula has historically been used as a food, adding flavour to cereals, rice, and soups. The petals can be added to salads for their brilliant colour. As recently as 70 years ago, American physicians used calendula to treat amenorrhea, conjunctivitis, fevers, cuts, scrapes, bruises, and burns, as well as minor infections.

This old-fashioned flower has a long history as both an ornamental garden plant and as an herb. When dried, the petals of Calendula flowers provide a culinary substitute for saffron; in times past, they were used to give a rich colour to cheese or butter.

Medicinal uses included treatments for measles and smallpox, as well as for dressing wounds on the battlefield. As well as being the traditional flower for October birthdays, calendula symbolizes sorrow and sympathy.

If deadheaded regularly, it will produce profuse blossoms all season long; in hotter regions, it may stop blooming in the heat of summer and begin again in autumn. This plant will readily reseed itself. Calendula can also be grown in containers.

Harvesting Calendula: For fresh flowers, cut the stems long and place them in water immediately. For culinary use, cut flower heads that have just opened; spread them out away from direct sunlight to dry completely, turning them occasionally. When the flowers are crisp and dry, store them in an airtight container for up to a year. The dried petals can be used in place of saffron, or as a garnish to add colour and spice to dishes.

EASY TO SEE AND HANDLE SEEDS.

Grow Notes
Plant in full or part sun in a well-drained soil for them to thrive. They are tolerant of poor soil and will bloom satisfactorily in all conditions except deep shade and extreme heat.

Self-seeding plant that drops seeds onto the soil at the end of the season so choose a semi-permanent position or deadhead plants before they can drop seed or to prolong flowering.

Sow
Plant 15mm deep and 50cm apart in Spring and Autumn, sown direct or raise as seedlings in good quality potting mix.

Keep soil moist, not wet or dry.

Germination
7- 14 days at 20-22°C

Maturity
70 -80 days. Annual that will regrow every year if left to go to seed.

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SOME FRUITS YOU WILL NEVER FIND IN THE SHOPS AND CAPE GOOSEBERRY IS ONE OF THEM! THE FIRST FRUIT TO BE GROWN IN THE AUSTRLALIAN COLONIES! CAPE GOOSEBERRY – AMAZING FRUITS THAT TASTE AMAZING TOO! Description Native to South America, the cape gooseberry is a low lying bush with itsSee more...

SOME FRUITS YOU WILL NEVER FIND IN THE SHOPS AND CAPE GOOSEBERRY IS ONE OF THEM! THE FIRST FRUIT TO BE GROWN IN THE AUSTRLALIAN COLONIES! CAPE GOOSEBERRY – AMAZING FRUITS THAT TASTE AMAZING TOO!

Description
Native to South America, the cape gooseberry is a low lying bush with its bright orange berry enclosed in a pale brown parchment-like case, called the Cape. The berry is the size of a cherry tomato, is very aromatic and full of tiny seeds. They are delicious eaten straight from the Cape or made into gooseberry Jam. They can be added to salads, desserts, and cooked dishes, they are delicious stewed with apples or dipped in chocolate. They can also be dried or used in savoury dishes with meats and seafood.

Very easy to germinate! Prolific amounts of fruit on every plant! Amazing eaten straight off the plant!

Grow Notes
Plant in full sun or part shade, 100cm apart in a well-drained soil enriched with compost. They have a low growing, sprawling habit with a height of 120cm and are frost tender.

For abundant harvests, grow two or more plants near each other to encourage cross-pollination.

Sow
Best raised as seedlings and transplanted into the garden once they are established. Sow in Spring and Summer at a depth of 4mm into good quality potting mix.

Keep soil moist but never wet.

Germination
14-42 days at 21-29°C

Maturity
140 days, Annual in cooler climates but can be grown as a Perennial in warmer climates.

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JUST A FEW CALORIES AND PACKED WITH VITAMINS! THESE BEAUTIES DESERVE A PLACE IN YOUR GARDEN! PERFECT FOR SMALL GARDENS, THOSE WITH ROCKY SOIL AND POTS! These fantastic carrots have great disease resistance. these ones origiante from central Asia even though they are best know in the veggie markets ofSee more...

JUST A FEW CALORIES AND PACKED WITH VITAMINS! THESE BEAUTIES DESERVE A PLACE IN YOUR GARDEN! PERFECT FOR SMALL GARDENS, THOSE WITH ROCKY SOIL AND POTS!

These fantastic carrots have great disease resistance. these ones origiante from central Asia even though they are best know in the veggie markets of Paris! carrots are said to have originated in the 13th century. Used by the Romans and used by ancient Greeks as a stomach tonic.

Sow seed direct, keeping seeds moist, can cover with hessian or similar till germination which is usually about 5-6 days, then uncover to let light in. Rotate crops to prevent disease build-up. Cleaned carrots store well in cool conditions. Sow spring, summer and autumn, best not sown in heavy frost.

This one has an excellent flavour delicious for snacking on raw with or without dip. Other uses for this variety include grating it for use in sandwiches, coleslaws and salads, slicing and cooking it in casseroles and stir-fries, or dicing it as an addition to soups.

Carrots are rich in a pigment responsible for their orange colour known as Beta-carotene. Beta-carotene is converted by the body into Vitamin A, it’s such a good source in fact that you can get all the Vitamin A you need in a day from just a single carrot.

Grow Notes

Carrots can be planted in a garden bed that has previously grown a full crop – they like the soil and fertiliser found after the crop has been harvested. Or use a fresh bed for them!

Carrots need a good quality, well worked-over, friable (lightly textured) soil to produce a long, straight taproot. Carrots grown in clay and compacted soils will be stumpy and have multiple forks. Avoid feeding your Carrot plants too much fertiliser as this can also encourage forking.

Try to remove any small rocks from the soil too as they’ll cause forking if the carrot root grows into them. Carrots can be grown in full sun or in a location that receives light shade for part of the day.

Sow
Sow these Carrot seeds now and at any time during the year. Carrot seeds are quite small so mix with sand or fine potting mix prior to sowing or use a seed dispenser, seed tape or tool such as a damp toothpick if needing aid in sowing them.

Plant Carrot seed about 5mm deep. You can either sow several seed into each planting hole spaced 4cm apart or alternatively you can sow more densely along a trench, with rows 25cm apart.

After 4 weeks thin to healthy seedlings leaving about a 4cm gap between seedlings. Sow a few seed every week to ensure a continuing supply of delicious carrots.

Keep soil moist but never wet.

Protect young seedlings from pests, pets and weather until they are established.

Germination
14-21 days at 10-30°C

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CAT GRASS! GIVE YOUR KITTY A TREAT! COMPLETELY NATURAL, THIS IS NOT CAT NIP – IT HAS NO PSYCHOACTIVE ACTIONS. Description Recently a lady told me her cat passed away after chewing on grass next to a toxic plant in her garden, the cat must have ingested some of theSee more...

CAT GRASS! GIVE YOUR KITTY A TREAT! COMPLETELY NATURAL, THIS IS NOT CAT NIP – IT HAS NO PSYCHOACTIVE ACTIONS.

Description
Recently a lady told me her cat passed away after chewing on grass next to a toxic plant in her garden, the cat must have ingested some of the toxic plant with the grass. This made me think about how much cats actually do need the enzymes in grass for digestion and if they do need it, and how it might be a good idea to get some seeds of cat grass for us all.

Usually, your cat would get vegetation from the stomachs and digestive organs of animals it catches for prey. Often the foods we feed them will not contain these things and a cat will go searching for grass, it hasn’t been proven exactly why cats do it but they do it, and regularly!
Often cats can be trained to eat the grass and not your indoor plants (which are often highly toxic). There has been no study into what cats do it for, but they do love it and it’s a way of keeping your cat happy without much bother! Cats also love to lay on the grass and it’s a nice way of bringing the outdoors in if your cat is housebound.

Grow Notes
Easy to grow and fast growing.

Cat grass is non-invasive, it grows in clumps, and does not self-seed readily. It’s easy to grow and you can grow it in trays, pots and straight into the garden – cat grass is not cat nip – and has no addictive or psychoactive ingredients.

Sow
Sprinkle seeds on surface of soil and cover thinly with soil.

Keep soil moist but not wet.

Germination
5-10 days at 20-30°C

Maturity
20-30 days.

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EVER WANTED A DELICIOUSLY SCENTED CHAMOMILE LAWN AND/OR FRESH CHAMOMILE TEA? IT SOUND SO ROMANTIC AND IT REALLY IS SOMETHING VERY SPECIAL! AND NO MOWING – EVER!!! YOU WILL NEVER KNOW THE FEELING OF LAYING ON THE SOFTNESS OF A CHAMOMILE LAWN UNLESS YOU MAKE ONE! ROMAN CHAMOMILE IS THESee more...

EVER WANTED A DELICIOUSLY SCENTED CHAMOMILE LAWN AND/OR FRESH CHAMOMILE TEA? IT SOUND SO ROMANTIC AND IT REALLY IS SOMETHING VERY SPECIAL! AND NO MOWING – EVER!!! YOU WILL NEVER KNOW THE FEELING OF LAYING ON THE SOFTNESS OF A CHAMOMILE LAWN UNLESS YOU MAKE ONE!

ROMAN CHAMOMILE IS THE LAWN CHAMOMILE THAT EVERYONE TALKS ABOUT! GREAT UNDER SEATING IN YOUR GARDEN AS YOU CRUSH IT WHEN YOU SIT AND PUT YOUR FEET ON IT RELEASING THE AMAZING SCENT, PERFECT IN AREAS THAT REAL LAWN IS NOT WANTED OR IS A BUGGER TO MOW – PLUS YOU CAN DRINK IT IN TEAS AND INFUSIONS, USE IT IN HERBAL MEDICINES AND PUT IT INTO YOUR PILLOW TO CREATE RESTFUL SLEEP!

Description
Lawn chamomile is not hardy enough to withstand heavy traffic but you can sprinkle the seeds in the cracks of your pavement or open the slabs up a bit and pop some soil in between, this way you can still walk on it and create that stunning scent without damaging the plants! You can also make a sleeping garden – one where you would lay down and breath it all in without actually using it as a thoroughfare.

If you want to seed a whole lawn, then grow your seeds in trays so you get the maximum spread and can plant them in equal spaces – once you have the seedlings up you can use every single one to create your lawn, your thinning out will basically be planting in! Chamomile is one of the nicest lawns I have ever laid on! And we are going to create one in our own garden soon which I am really looking forward to!

Chamomile is also a great lawn for fairy gardens, it makes tiny white and yellow flowers adding to the sights, smells and giving that little bit of extra realism to your gardens!

Grow Notes
Chamomile will bloom more often when there is good drainage in the soil, a soil with a PH of 5.5-7.5 is optimal. It likes full to part sun and a moist soil.

Sow
Chamomile does not like too much disturbance so if you can sow direct into the garden you should, however a tray is fine if you can wedge the seedlings out with the soil that surrounds them and them space them out in your garden.

Spread seeds over the moist soil and cover very lightly at 1mm, keep the soil moist until germination then gradually cut down the watering times.

The best time to plant is from late Winter to mid-Summer, I have been able to germinate this between these times very well. If you are in a colder environment wait until daytime temps are around 22C.

Germination
7-14 days at 12-25°C

Maturity
230 days

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ATTRACTIVE AND MUCH SMALLER THAN THE CLOSE UP PICTURE - BLACK CHIA SEEDS ARE A SUPERFOOD THAT HAS SEEN A METEORIC INCREASE IN THEIR USE ACROSS THE WORLD! Black chia seeds come from the plant Salvia hispanica, which is a flowering plant in the mint family (Lamiaceae). Chia seeds areSee more...

ATTRACTIVE AND MUCH SMALLER THAN THE CLOSE UP PICTURE – BLACK CHIA SEEDS ARE A SUPERFOOD THAT HAS SEEN A METEORIC INCREASE IN THEIR USE ACROSS THE WORLD!

Black chia seeds come from the plant Salvia hispanica, which is a flowering plant in the mint family (Lamiaceae). Chia seeds are known for their nutritional benefits and versatility in various culinary applications. Here’s an overview of black Chia seeds, their benefits, uses, and how to grow them from seed:

Benefits of Black Chia Seeds:

  1. Nutrient-Rich: Chia seeds are a good source of essential nutrients, including fibre, protein, omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidants, and various vitamins and minerals.
  2. Rich in Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Chia seeds are one of the plant-based sources of omega-3 fatty acids, which are important for heart health.
  3. High in Fiber: The high fibre content in chia seeds can help support digestive health and promote a feeling of fullness.
  4. Versatile: Chia seeds have a mild, nutty flavor and can be easily incorporated into a variety of dishes, such as smoothies, yogurt, oatmeal, salads, and baked goods.
  5. Hydration: Chia seeds can absorb water and form a gel-like consistency, which can help with hydration and may be beneficial for athletes.

Culinary Uses: Black chia seeds are often used in the following ways:

  1. Smoothies: Add chia seeds to smoothies for a nutritional boost and to create a thicker consistency.
  2. Puddings: Chia seeds can be mixed with liquids like milk or plant-based alternatives to create a pudding-like texture when left to soak.
  3. Baking: Incorporate chia seeds into baking recipes such as muffins, bread, and granola bars.
  4. Yogurt and Oatmeal Toppings: Sprinkle chia seeds on top of yogurt or oatmeal for added texture and nutrition.

Growing Black Chia Seeds from Seed:

Plant in late Spring to late Summer or when the temperatures for the next three months will be 20-30 degrees during the day.

  1. Soil Preparation: Chia plants prefer well-draining soil. Prepare the soil by mixing in organic matter to improve fertility.
  2. Planting: Sow chia seeds directly into the garden or in containers. Plant the seeds at a depth of about 5-10mm. This out seedlings as they grow keeping the strongest.
  3. Watering: Keep the soil consistently moist but not waterlogged. Chia plants are drought-tolerant, but regular watering helps with germination and growth.
  4. Sunlight: Chia plants thrive in full sun. Ensure they receive at least 6-8 hours of sunlight per day.
  5. Temperature: Chia plants prefer warm temperatures so plant them in late spring to late summer.
  6. Harvesting: Chia plants typically start flowering about 8-12 weeks after planting. Harvest the seeds when the flower heads dry up and the seeds are mature. Cutting too early can reduce the nutrient value of the seeds. Cut the flower heads and allow them to dry further before collecting the seeds.
  7. Drying and Storing: Once harvested, allow the seeds to dry completely before storing them in a cool, dry place. Properly dried chia seeds can be stored for an extended period.

Growing chia seeds is relatively straightforward, and they can make a valuable addition to a home garden, providing both ornamental value and a nutrient-rich harvest.

Germination
2-7 days at 20-30°C

Maturity
70-90 days

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CHICK MIX! THIS WILL ATTRACT THE CHICKS! LITERALLY! PUT IT IN WITH YOUR CHICKENS, BIRDS, SMALL ANIMALS AND EVEN YOU CAN GRAB SALAD FOR A SANDWICH FROM THIS GREAT MIX! Description It's easy to grow and they can also be put in with your birds and small animals of allSee more...

CHICK MIX! THIS WILL ATTRACT THE CHICKS! LITERALLY! PUT IT IN WITH YOUR CHICKENS, BIRDS, SMALL ANIMALS AND EVEN YOU CAN GRAB SALAD FOR A SANDWICH FROM THIS GREAT MIX!

Description

It’s easy to grow and they can also be put in with your birds and small animals of all kinds and you can even pinch some of it for yourself! It contains so many kinds of chicken (and human) forage such as Chicory, Endive, Millet, Sunflowers, Mustard Greens, Sorghum, Lettuce and so many more herbs and plants that chickens love!

Because you put the flats or pots into the run bit by bit you can pace them so they don’t get too much green, and the eggs they produce will be so much healthier and fuller of all the right things!

ready to feed to the chickens! When ready, just place one of your planted containers into the chicken run and watch the girls go crazy! They love it and will quickly devour it all.

Using mini-pastures is especially good if you are going on vacation and can’t let the girls free range for a period of time too.

The mix contains all of the things below!

Parsley
Coriander
Dill
Basil
Kale
Endive
Rocket
Lettuce
Cress
Mustard Greens
Chicory
Millet
Sorghum
Plantain
Amaranth
Wheat
Medic
Pak Choi
Silver beet
Buckwheat
Amaranth
Quinoa
Fenugreek
Linseed
Millet
Wheat
Triticale
Dun Peas
Maize

So your chickens and birds (and small animals of all kinds!) will adore these!

Grow Notes
If you have chooks or any kind of birds they will love this! Just like you can grow a nursery flat (those flat containers they put the punnets in) or a shallow tub or any container with salad greens for yourself and your family, you can also grow a portable forage bed for your birds and small animals!

And if you have the space, you can also plant this blend in an open area of your garden. To keep the plants going, only let the chickens “mow” it half way down and then move them out to let it regrow. You can keep rotating them through the “pasture” for an entire season with minimal reseeding!

Sow
No matter what container you choose, simply fill it with potting soil and pat down lightly. Sprinkle some of the forage blend seed over the soil. Cover with a thin layer of additional soil and gently water in.

Keep soil moist not wet until germination.

Germination
4- 7 days at 10-15°C

Maturity
10-20 days. You don’t need to grow them right to the end, just to the new leaf stage and each time they get eaten down they will re-grow if not completely devoured. If they were simply re-pack your soil and plant your container again.

 

Our friend Amelia in the USA sent us her guide to what should be in your coop! Check it out by copying and pasting this into your browser window! https://chickenraising101.com/what-should-be-inside-a-chicken-coop/

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PACKED WITH PROTEIN! ONE CUP OF THESE GIVES YOU 1/3 OF YOUR PROTEIN NEEDS PER DAY! LOWERS CHOLESTEROL, SELENIUM FOR MENTAL HEALTH, HELPS DIABETES AND HAS SO MANY NUTRIENTS YOU WILL FEEL SO GOOD GROWING YOUR OWN! USE THEM IN SALADS, STEWS, SOUPS, STIR FRY, SPROUTS, ETC. Also referred toSee more...

PACKED WITH PROTEIN! ONE CUP OF THESE GIVES YOU 1/3 OF YOUR PROTEIN NEEDS PER DAY! LOWERS CHOLESTEROL, SELENIUM FOR MENTAL HEALTH, HELPS DIABETES AND HAS SO MANY NUTRIENTS YOU WILL FEEL SO GOOD GROWING YOUR OWN! USE THEM IN SALADS, STEWS, SOUPS, STIR FRY, SPROUTS, ETC.

Also referred to as black chickpea, Bengal gram, or Kala chana, the desi chickpea distinguishes itself by its smaller size, darker brown hue, and thick, rough seed coat. The term “Desi” originates from Hindustani, signifying “country” or “local.” Desi chickpeas boast a notably higher fiber content compared to other varieties and exhibit a lower glycemic index. Believed to be among the earliest varieties, its resemblance to seeds discovered at archaeological sites is striking.

Typically, the dark seed coat is removed, and the seed is split in half to yield “Chana Dahl” or Besan Flour. When used in its whole form, it commonly enriches curries or casseroles.

The fibre, potassium, B vitamins, iron, magnesium, and selenium in chickpeas all support heart health and many other areas of the body too! The chickpea or chick pea is a legume of the plant family Fabaceae, subfamily Faboideae. The plant is grown for its nutritious seeds. Its seeds are high in protein and fibre.

Chickpeas contain a range of nutrients, including protein, which is necessary for bone, muscle, and skin health.

For people who are cutting down on meat consumption, a dish of chickpeas and rice, for example, can contribute a significant amount of protein to the diet. A cup of chickpeas provides almost one-third of an adult’s daily protein needs.

The nutrients in chickpeas may also help prevent a number of health conditions.

Diabetes

One cup of chickpeas, weighing 164 grams (g), provides 12.5 g of fibre.

Fibre may benefit people with diabetes, and the American Diabetes Association recommend chickpeas as a source of dietary fibre. A 2014 study concluded that eating at least 30 g of fibre per day could help reduce inflammation in people with type 1 diabetes.

A 2018 review of meta-analyses found that a high fibre diet may help lower blood glucose levels and reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that adults consume 25.2–28.0 g of fibre a day, depending on age and sex.

Chickpeas can play a role in a healthful diabetes meal plan.

Bone health

The iron, calcium, and other nutrients in chickpeas can all contribute to healthy bone structure and strength. Chickpeas can play a role in the diet of people who want to prevent osteoporosis.

Blood pressure

To prevent high blood pressure, experts recommend limiting the intake of added sodium, or salt, and increasing the intake of potassium.

Current guidelines recommend that adults consume at least 4,700 milligrams (mg) of potassium per day.

A cup of chickpeas, weighing 164 g, provides 474 mg of potassium.

Grow your own and no salt is added! People who use canned chickpeas should check how much sodium the manufacturers have added! Cooking with chickpeas can help limit the amount of salt in a meal.

Adults should keep their sodium intake below 2,300 mg per day, while people aged 51 or over and those with risk factors for cardiovascular disease should consume less than 1,500 mg per day.

Heart health

The fibre, potassium, B vitamins, iron, magnesium, and selenium in chickpeas all support heart health.

Fibre helps decrease the risk of heart disease by lowering cholesterol levels in the blood. Chickpeas contain no cholesterol.

Cancer

Free radicals are toxic substances that accumulate in the body, as a result of metabolism and other factors. As these toxins build up, they can damage cells and lead to a variety of health problems, including cancer.

Antioxidants help the body remove free radicals, and the selenium and beta carotene in chickpeas act as antioxidants.

A cup of chickpeas contains 6.1 micrograms (mcg) of selenium. The Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) recommend that adults consume 55 mcg of selenium a day. They also note that selenium’s antioxidant activity may help protect the body from cancer.
In addition, there is evidence that fibre, which chickpeas contain, can help reduce the risk of colorectal cancer.

Cholesterol

A small 2006 study found that participants had less low density lipoprotein (LDL), or “bad,” cholesterol in their blood when they ate a diet with added chickpeas, compared with a diet with added wheat, for 5 weeks.

The researchers noted that the fibre in chickpeas may be responsible for the reduction in LDL cholesterol.

Mental health

A cup of chickpeas contains 69.7 mg of choline, which helps with brain and nervous system function. Choline plays a role in mood, muscle control, learning, and memory, as well as the body’s metabolism.

The ODS recommend that adults consume 400–550 mg of choline a day, depending on sex and whether they are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Some research suggests that a selenium deficiency may increase the risk of cognitive decline in older people. This would imply that selenium can support cognitive health, including memory and thinking.

Digestion and regularity

Fibre helps keep the digestive tract healthy and promotes regularity. Chickpeas are a good source of fibre.

Weight management and satiety
Dietary fibres function as bulking agents in the digestive system. Bulking agents increase the feeling of fullness after eating, and protein has the same effect.

Feeling fuller for longer after eating can help reduce the appetite and lower a person’s caloric intake.

Anemia

Without iron, the body cannot deliver oxygen to its cells, and this can lead to iron deficiency anemia. Symptoms include weakness and tiredness. In severe cases, life threatening complications can arise.
A cup of chickpeas contains 4.7 mg of iron, or between a half and one-fifth of a person’s daily requirement, depending on the individual. It also provides some vitamin C, which helps the body absorb iron.

Grow Notes
Prefers full sun with moist fertile and well-drained soil. Keep well-watered in hot weather.

Young seedlings need protection from pets, pests and weather until they are established.

Do not re-plant chickpeas in the same place as a previous chickpea crop for 3-4 years.

Sow
Sow direct, or raise seedlings, 20mm deep and 20cm apart.

Keep soil moist not wet until germination.

Germination
7-30 days at 10-15°C

Maturity
100 days

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PACKED WITH PROTEIN! ONE CUP OF THESE GIVES YOU 1/3 OF YOUR PROTEIN NEEDS PER DAY! LOWERS CHOLESTEROL, SELENIUM FOR MENTAL HEALTH, HELPS DIABETES AND HAS SO MANY NUTRIENTS YOU WILL FEEL SO GOOD GROWING YOUR OWN! USE THEM IN SALADS, STEWS, SOUPS, STIR FRY, SPROUTS, ETC. IT'S A SUPERBSee more...

PACKED WITH PROTEIN! ONE CUP OF THESE GIVES YOU 1/3 OF YOUR PROTEIN NEEDS PER DAY! LOWERS CHOLESTEROL, SELENIUM FOR MENTAL HEALTH, HELPS DIABETES AND HAS SO MANY NUTRIENTS YOU WILL FEEL SO GOOD GROWING YOUR OWN! USE THEM IN SALADS, STEWS, SOUPS, STIR FRY, SPROUTS, ETC.

IT’S A SUPERB MEAT SUBSTITUTE – EVEN KFC IN THE USA IS USING TYSON CHICKPEAS AS THE MAIN INGREDIANT IN NON MEAT CHICKEN NUGGETS AND THEY ARE AMAZINGLY POPULAR!

Description
The fibre, potassium, B vitamins, iron, magnesium, and selenium in chickpeas all support heart health and many other areas of the body too! The chickpea or chick pea is a legume of the plant family Fabaceae, subfamily Faboideae. The plant is grown for its nutritious seeds. Its seeds are high in protein and fibre.

Other names for chickpeas are gram, Bengal gram, garbanzo, garbanzo bean, and Egyptian pea

Chickpeas contain a range of nutrients, including protein, which is necessary for bone, muscle, and skin health.

For people who are cutting down on meat consumption, a dish of chickpeas and rice, for example, can contribute a significant amount of protein to the diet. A cup of chickpeas provides almost one-third of an adult’s daily protein needs.

The nutrients in chickpeas may also help prevent a number of health conditions.

Diabetes

One cup of chickpeas, weighing 164 grams (g), provides 12.5 g of fibre.

Fibre may benefit people with diabetes, and the American Diabetes Association recommend chickpeas as a source of dietary fibre. A 2014 study concluded that eating at least 30 g of fibre per day could help reduce inflammation in people with type 1 diabetes.

A 2018 review of meta-analyses found that a high fibre diet may help lower blood glucose levels and reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that adults consume 25.2–28.0 g of fibre a day, depending on age and sex.

Chickpeas can play a role in a healthful diabetes meal plan.

Bone health

The iron, calcium, and other nutrients in chickpeas can all contribute to healthy bone structure and strength. Chickpeas can play a role in the diet of people who want to prevent osteoporosis.

Blood pressure

To prevent high blood pressure, experts recommend limiting the intake of added sodium, or salt, and increasing the intake of potassium.

Current guidelines recommend that adults consume at least 4,700 milligrams (mg) of potassium per day.

A cup of chickpeas, weighing 164 g, provides 474 mg of potassium.

Grow your own and no salt is added! People who use canned chickpeas should check how much sodium the manufacturers have added! Cooking with chickpeas can help limit the amount of salt in a meal.

Adults should keep their sodium intake below 2,300 mg per day, while people aged 51 or over and those with risk factors for cardiovascular disease should consume less than 1,500 mg per day.

Heart health

The fibre, potassium, B vitamins, iron, magnesium, and selenium in chickpeas all support heart health.

Fibre helps decrease the risk of heart disease by lowering cholesterol levels in the blood. Chickpeas contain no cholesterol.

Cancer

Free radicals are toxic substances that accumulate in the body, as a result of metabolism and other factors. As these toxins build up, they can damage cells and lead to a variety of health problems, including cancer.

Antioxidants help the body remove free radicals, and the selenium and beta carotene in chickpeas act as antioxidants.

A cup of chickpeas contains 6.1 micrograms (mcg) of selenium. The Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) recommend that adults consume 55 mcg of selenium a day. They also note that selenium’s antioxidant activity may help protect the body from cancer.
In addition, there is evidence that fibre, which chickpeas contain, can help reduce the risk of colorectal cancer.

Cholesterol

A small 2006 study found that participants had less low density lipoprotein (LDL), or “bad,” cholesterol in their blood when they ate a diet with added chickpeas, compared with a diet with added wheat, for 5 weeks.

The researchers noted that the fibre in chickpeas may be responsible for the reduction in LDL cholesterol.

Mental health

A cup of chickpeas contains 69.7 mg of choline, which helps with brain and nervous system function. Choline plays a role in mood, muscle control, learning, and memory, as well as the body’s metabolism.

The ODS recommend that adults consume 400–550 mg of choline a day, depending on sex and whether they are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Some research suggests that a selenium deficiency may increase the risk of cognitive decline in older people. This would imply that selenium can support cognitive health, including memory and thinking.

Digestion and regularity

Fibre helps keep the digestive tract healthy and promotes regularity. Chickpeas are a good source of fibre.

Weight management and satiety
Dietary fibres function as bulking agents in the digestive system. Bulking agents increase the feeling of fullness after eating, and protein has the same effect.

Feeling fuller for longer after eating can help reduce the appetite and lower a person’s caloric intake.

Anemia

Without iron, the body cannot deliver oxygen to its cells, and this can lead to iron deficiency anemia. Symptoms include weakness and tiredness. In severe cases, life threatening complications can arise.
A cup of chickpeas contains 4.7 mg of iron, or between a half and one-fifth of a person’s daily requirement, depending on the individual. It also provides some vitamin C, which helps the body absorb iron.

Grow Notes
Prefers full sun with moist fertile and well-drained soil. Keep well-watered in hot weather.

Young seedlings need protection from pets, pests and weather until they are established.

Do not re-plant chickpeas in the same place as a previous chickpea crop for 3-4 years.

Sow
Sow direct, or raise seedlings, 20mm deep and 20cm apart.

Keep soil moist not wet until germination.

Germination
7-30 days at 10-15°C

Maturity
100 days

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CHILLI CHOCOLATE SCORPION IS A DELICIOUS CHILLI WITH A STINGER AT THE END AND THAT SURE ISN’T JUST FOR SHOW! Description A natural variant of the red Trinidad Moruga Scorpion. It is thought to be slightly hotter. This chocolate coloured version produces bigger pods that can weigh up to 18g.See more...

CHILLI CHOCOLATE SCORPION IS A DELICIOUS CHILLI WITH A STINGER AT THE END AND THAT SURE ISN’T JUST FOR SHOW!

Description
A natural variant of the red Trinidad Moruga Scorpion. It is thought to be slightly hotter. This chocolate coloured version produces bigger pods that can weigh up to 18g. Not all fruits will develop the stinger but they do have the same bonnet/ hood type shape to the pods.
One of the World’s hottest chillies at 2 million SHU! Harvest in 11-13 weeks. Blistering hot at up to 2M SHU. Sweet and fruity undertones. Great for sauces but use sparingly!
WARNING! These chillies are extremely hot and should be handled with care.
SEEDS SMALL, EASY TO SEE AND HANDLE, WEAR GLOVES WHEN TOUCHING SEEDS AND DON’T TOUCH YOUR FACE! THESE CAN BURN THE SKIN.

Grow Notes
These are extremely hot! Wear gloves when handling seed and fruit, keep away from children. Wash hands thoroughly after handling, especially before touching your face.

Plant in full sun but keep well-watered. They need a well-drained soil enriched with plenty of organic matter.

Can be grown in containers or gardens. Once fruiting plants may need staking if starting to lean. Pick regularly to encourage more fruit.

Chilli plants are susceptible to mildews and need protection from aphids.

Sow
Sow direct or in pots in Spring, after chances of frost has passed. If living in a warmer climate they can be grown in any season. Sow 5mm deep with 50cm spacing and 100cm between rows.

Keep soil moist but never wet.

Germination
7-21 days at 22-35°C

Maturity
60- 120 days.

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The Bhut Jolokia was the world's hottest chilli between 2007-2011, measuring in at over one million Scoville heat units (SHUs) in replicated tests at the New Mexico State University. It is also commonly known as the 'ghost chilli' or 'ghost pepper'. Bhuts are renowned for their 'slow burn' - withSee more...

The Bhut Jolokia was the world’s hottest chilli between 2007-2011, measuring in at over one million Scoville heat units (SHUs) in replicated tests at the New Mexico State University. It is also commonly known as the ‘ghost chilli’ or ‘ghost pepper’. Bhuts are renowned for their ‘slow burn’ – with the heat taking about 30 seconds to kick in and sticking around for as long as 30 minutes.

This makes them great for creating your own bug spray! Mix the finely sliced up chilli with some washing up detergent and water, put the whole lot in a spray bottle and there you go!

Heat level: Hot

Grow Notes
Wear gloves when handling seed and fruit, keep away from children. Wash hands thoroughly after handling, especially before touching your face.

Plant in full sun but keep well-watered. They need a well-drained soil enriched with plenty of organic matter.

Can be grown in containers or gardens. Once fruiting plants may need staking if starting to lean. Pick regularly to encourage more fruit.

Chilli plants are susceptible to mildews so water at the base and don’t leave the plant leaves wet overnight, best to water in the morning or at least a few hours before sundown.

Sow
Sow direct or in pots in Spring, after chances of frost has passed. If living in a warmer climate they can be grown in any season. Sow 5mm deep with 50cm spacing and 100cm between rows.

Keep soil moist but never wet.

Germination
7-21 days at 22-35°C

Maturity
60- 120 days.

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QUEEN ANNE'S LACE – A MEDIEVAL MARVEL AND A BEAUTIFUL GARDEN FLOWER! SURVIVES DROUGHT WITH EASE! YOU CAN EAT THEM TOO! NOW AVAILABLE IN CHOCOLATE! ALSO KNOWN AS THE CHOCOLATE LACE FLOWER. Early Europeans cultivated Queen Anne's lace, while the Romans incorporated its root into their cuisine as a vegetable.See more...

QUEEN ANNE’S LACE – A MEDIEVAL MARVEL AND A BEAUTIFUL GARDEN FLOWER! SURVIVES DROUGHT WITH EASE! YOU CAN EAT THEM TOO! NOW AVAILABLE IN CHOCOLATE! ALSO KNOWN AS THE CHOCOLATE LACE FLOWER.

Early Europeans cultivated Queen Anne’s lace, while the Romans incorporated its root into their cuisine as a vegetable. With research revealing its remarkable sugar content, second only to beets among root vegetables, this plant became a sweetening agent for the Irish, Hindus, and Jews. Across various cultures, its seeds have served as aromatic flavorings in soups and culinary dishes.

Notably, Wild Carrot leaves contain porphyrins, known to stimulate the pituitary gland and elevate sex hormone levels, as well as induce uterine contractions. Herbalists historically used it to prompt delayed menstruation, making it unsuitable for pregnant individuals.

Today, both the roots and flowers find diverse applications. The roots, preferably harvested in the first year but still viable in the second, can be enjoyed raw, cooked, or roasted, with roasting being a favored method. Post-roasting, they can be ground into a powder akin to coffee. Additionally, the flowers are harvested for beverages and jellies, adding to the plant’s versatile uses.

Scientific Name: Daucus carota

Life Cycle: Annual

Characteristics: Produces lovely dark purple, pink, or white lacy umbels, ideal for floral arrangements.

Plant Height: Reaches up to 1.5 meters.

Season: Best suited for sowing in autumn and early spring.

Sowing Depth + Method: Optimal results are achieved when sown directly into the soil, covering lightly.

Tips: Prior to sowing, chilling seeds at 5-8°C for 1-2 weeks enhances germination. Seedling establishment thrives in cooler temperatures ranging from 14-17°C.

Spacing: Recommended spacing is 30cm.

Position: Flourishes in full sun.

Days until Germination: Typically germinates within 7-21 days when kept at temperatures of 16-18°C.

Seed to Bloom: Blossoms emerge approximately 14 weeks after sowing.

Sowing Timing Guide:

  • Cool Climate: March, April, and May
  • Temperate Climate: March, April, and May
  • Sub-tropical Climate: April, May, and June

Warning: pregnant women should never ingest this herb. Always consult a medical practitioner before embarking on any program. The information on this page is not diagnostic, therefore always consult a herbal practitioner or your GP in order to obtain a diagnosis. Never stop taking prescribed treatment without consulting your GP or a qualified herbal practitioner. Do not take without qualified medical advice.

 

Pic by Derek Harper / Wild carrot, Thatcher Point

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CITRONELLA BALM IS THE BANE OF ALL FLIES AND MOZZIES! RUB IT ON YOUR SKIN TO REPEL MOZZIES AND GNATS! A POT OUTSIDE YOUR DOORS AND WINDOWS CAN REPEL THOSE NASTIES FOREVER! ATTRACTS BEES AND BUTTERFLIES! LUSH LEAVES AND PRETTY TOO! THE NAME MELISSA OFFICINALIS COMES FROM ‘MELISSA’ WHICH ISSee more...

CITRONELLA BALM IS THE BANE OF ALL FLIES AND MOZZIES! RUB IT ON YOUR SKIN TO REPEL MOZZIES AND GNATS! A POT OUTSIDE YOUR DOORS AND WINDOWS CAN REPEL THOSE NASTIES FOREVER! ATTRACTS BEES AND BUTTERFLIES! LUSH LEAVES AND PRETTY TOO! THE NAME MELISSA OFFICINALIS COMES FROM ‘MELISSA’ WHICH IS THE GREEK WORD FOR BEE!

Description
Melissa officinalis citronella- Bursting with a relaxing, soothing scent, this is the most fragrant, flavourful variety available. A lush, bushy growth habit with flowers that attract bees and butterflies. Use in herbal teas, fruit, and fish dishes, or plant in a pot as a mosquito repellent for your outdoor sitting area. Not the same as ordinary Lemon Balm but one of the family of Lemon Balms, Citronella Balm contains citronellol and citronellal, the chemicals responsible for the citronella scent.

We love this herb! Simply crush a handful of the leaves for a burst of citronella fragrance and rub on exposed skin to deter pesky mosquitoes and gnats.

The leaves are bright green and about 2 inches long with toothed edges. Although citronella balm is a member of the mint family, it is a less aggressive spreader. To the casual glance the leaves resemble spearmint leaves, probably why it’s sometimes misidentified as lemon mint.

As with lemon balm, citronella balm is a favourite of bees. The botanical name “Melissa” is derived from the Greek word for bee.

Grow Notes
Plant in full sun to part shade in fertile, moist soil. Suitable for containers or gardens.

It is more compact and more mildew resistant than the common lemon balm.

Sow
Sow in Spring, pressing seed onto the soil surface and barely covering. Keep moist until germination.

Once seedlings are large enough to handle, transplant at a spacing of 45cm into the garden or 3 seedlings per 15cm pot.

Germination
10-14 days.

Maturity
Herbaceous Perennial.

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BUSH TUCKER! CLEMATIS MICROPHYLLA IS ALSO CALLED OLD MAN’S BEARD AND YOU CAN SEE WHY! DRESSES UP EUCALYPTUS AND OTHER TRUNKS, DROUGHT AND FROST TOLERANT! PEPPERY ROOTS ARE EATEN AND LEAVES CAN ADD A PEPPER TASTE TO OTHER FOODS! Description Crushing the leaves and inhaling their peppery aroma has beenSee more...

BUSH TUCKER! CLEMATIS MICROPHYLLA IS ALSO CALLED OLD MAN’S BEARD AND YOU CAN SEE WHY! DRESSES UP EUCALYPTUS AND OTHER TRUNKS, DROUGHT AND FROST TOLERANT! PEPPERY ROOTS ARE EATEN AND LEAVES CAN ADD A PEPPER TASTE TO OTHER FOODS!

Description
Crushing the leaves and inhaling their peppery aroma has been used by native peoples as a way to relieve headaches. Steaming the leaves and placing them on arthritic and just plain achy joints can bring welcome relief quite quickly!

Can be used as a screen or ground cover in coastal locations, native parks and reserves. The Clematis is ‘dioeceious’ with slightly different flowers on the female and male plants. The flowers on the females produce seed heads with fluffy white and silvery beards which is why they are often referred to as ‘ Old-man’s Beard’. Provides nesting sites for native birds and attracts bees.

Cultural use: Indigenous peoples used the cooked roots for food, fibre for decoration and leaves as a medicine.

The flowers are greenish white and very bird attracting.
Clematis microphylla is a member of the Ranunculaceae family and is a vigorous climber. Leaves are lance-shaped in threes, dull green or greyish and each leaflet is up to three centimetres long.

The flowers are up to four centimetres across, greenish-cream and cover the climber from August to November. The flowers, of female plants, produce one-seeded, small, dry fruits that have a feathery tail. The fruits are very light and the feathery tail allows them to be dispersed by the wind.
C. microphylla is a double-barrelled plant. Both when in flower and fruiting vines are eye-catching features. C. microphylla is found throughout Australia except in the Northern Territory.

BOAT SHAPED, LIGHT BROWN SEEDS, EASY TO SEE AND HANDLE.

Grow Notes
A drought and frost tolerant, evergreen vine, it is a vigorous grower to 3 meters and may be used as a groundcover given the absence of something to climb on or a climber when given a structure to climb on.

Does best in well-drained soils in a sunny spot.

C. microphylla flowers from July to December. Male and female flowers develop on different plants, female plants develop fluffy, cottonwool-like fruits.

Sow
Germination of C. microphylla seeds can be sped up by removing the outer casing with a piece of sandpaper or with a knife being very careful not to cut into the pulp of the seed, or by exposing seed to a cycle of wetting and drying before planting.

Sow in Spring or Summer. Place seed beneath the soil to 5 mm, cover with layer of soil or fine gravel and keep moist in open sunny position.

Germination
56 days.

Maturity
2-3 years.

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ATTRACTS BEES AND BENEFICIAL INSECTS TO YOUR GARDEN! MORROCAN CORIANDER SHOULD BE LIGHTLY TOASTED TO BRING OUT THE UNIQUE AND AMAZING FLAVOURS IT HOLDS! Description Coriandrum sativum. A uniquely flavoured coriander with subtle hints of sweetness and citrus. This variety is mostly used in Indian, Latino and Middle Eastern cooking,See more...

ATTRACTS BEES AND BENEFICIAL INSECTS TO YOUR GARDEN! MORROCAN CORIANDER SHOULD BE LIGHTLY TOASTED TO BRING OUT THE UNIQUE AND AMAZING FLAVOURS IT HOLDS!

Description
Coriandrum sativum. A uniquely flavoured coriander with subtle hints of sweetness and citrus.

This variety is mostly used in Indian, Latino and Middle Eastern cooking, it pairs exceptionally well with fish and chicken dishes, and really lifts any dish that requires fresh coriander!

Grow Notes
Coriander grows best where the climate is hot and humid. In most parts of Western Australia, we can provide the heat that coriander loves but not the humidity so growing from Autumn to Spring is usually the most successful. Plant in part or full sun, in moist well-draining soil.

Coriander has a terrible habit of bolting to seed whenever the conditions that it is in changes. If the weather turns from hot to cold or cold to hot, it will decide that it is time to produce more seed and will send up flower heads from the centre of the plant. You can choose a slow bolting variety or sow it directly where it needs to grow as seed instead of transplanting the seedlings, this help develop a stronger plant.

By seeding a new planting of coriander every two or three weeks, a continuous supply of coriander can be achieved fresh from the garden since, when one plant is finishing being harvested, the next will be ready.

Sow
Sow direct in Autumn or Spring at a depth of 6mm, spacing plants 20cm apart.

Keep soil moist but never wet.

Germination
7-10 days at 18-22°C

Maturity
70 days

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SLOW-BOLT CORIANDER CURES THAT BOLTING PROBLEM SOME HAVE! IN HOT AREAS CORIANDER CAN RUSH TO SEED BUT NOT THIS ONE! AND RIGHT THROUGH TO SPRING - OFFERS A DELICIOUS FLAVOUR AND EASY GROWING! Description Coriander (Coriandrum sativum) has a pungent, citrus flavour to the leaves that some people adore andSee more...

SLOW-BOLT CORIANDER CURES THAT BOLTING PROBLEM SOME HAVE! IN HOT AREAS CORIANDER CAN RUSH TO SEED BUT NOT THIS ONE! AND RIGHT THROUGH TO SPRING – OFFERS A DELICIOUS FLAVOUR AND EASY GROWING!

Description
Coriander (Coriandrum sativum) has a pungent, citrus flavour to the leaves that some people adore and others detest. In fact, its name is derived from the Greek word for bug as they thought that it smelt like one that had been squashed! (I added that for the coriander haters! I think it smells gorgeous!)

All parts of coriander can be used. The leaves are used in Chinese, Thai and Mexican dishes to give a spicy flavour and the chopped root can be included in dishes that require more cooking. Coriander seed is also powdered and used in both sweet and savoury dishes.

There are several varieties of coriander. Slow bolt coriander will grow to about 60 centimetres tall.

The first step to direct sowing coriander is to choose a pot that is about 25 centimetres across. Fill it to about three centimetres from the top with a premium potting mix that contains slow release fertiliser and wetting agents.

Coriander is extremely fast growing and should be harvested often by taking the outside leaves from the base of the plant. The best flavour comes from the younger leaves, so it is best to accept that it is a short-lived plant.

Growing coriander is well worth the effort if just to add a touch of the exotic to both the garden and the dining table!

LARGE SEEDS, EASY TO SEE AND HANDLE.

Grow Notes
Coriander grows best where the climate is hot and humid. In most parts of Western Australia, we can provide the heat that coriander loves but not the humidity so growing from Autumn to Spring is usually the most successful. Plant in part or full sun, in moist well-draining soil.

Coriander has a terrible habit of bolting to seed whenever the conditions that it is in changes. If the weather turns from hot to cold or cold to hot, it will decide that it is time to produce more seed and will send up flower heads from the centre of the plant.

There are several ways to grow strong and healthy Coriander without it bolting to seed. The main one is to choose a slow bolting variety! Slow bolt Coriander will be more uniform and slower to produce flower heads so will be produce leaves for longer. The second way is to sow it directly where it needs to grow as seed instead of transplanting the seedlings.

By seeding a new planting of coriander every two or three weeks, a continuous supply of coriander can be achieved fresh from the garden since, when one plant is finishing being harvested, the next will be ready.

Sow
Sow direct in Autumn or Spring at a depth of 6mm, spacing plants 20cm apart.

Keep soil moist but never wet.

Germination
7-10 days at 18-22°C

Maturity
45 days

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SOLANUM MAMMOSUM IS AN ORNIMENTAL PLANT THAT IS ALSO CALLED THE NIPPLE FRUIT OR COW’S UDDER PLANT IS SIMPLY SPOOKTACULAR! USED TO POISON AND REPEL COCKROACHES IN TROPICAL AMERICA, IT HAS CRAZILY SHAPED FRUITS AND AN ATTRACTIVE LOOK. BRANCHES WITH THE BRIGHT FRUIT ATTACHED ARE OFTEN USED IN FLOWER ARRANGEMENTS.See more...

SOLANUM MAMMOSUM IS AN ORNIMENTAL PLANT THAT IS ALSO CALLED THE NIPPLE FRUIT OR COW’S UDDER PLANT IS SIMPLY SPOOKTACULAR! USED TO POISON AND REPEL COCKROACHES IN TROPICAL AMERICA, IT HAS CRAZILY SHAPED FRUITS AND AN ATTRACTIVE LOOK. BRANCHES WITH THE BRIGHT FRUIT ATTACHED ARE OFTEN USED IN FLOWER ARRANGEMENTS.

Originating in the Caribbean and widespread across the West Indian islands, S. mammosum, commonly known as the Nipple Fruit, has become a popular ornamental plant across tropical America. Recognizable by its distinct protuberances, the fruits of Solanum Mammosum rank among the largest within the Solanum genus.

While some specimens feature spines, others do not. Documented extensively, its utilization as a cockroach poison has contributed to its proliferation among tribes throughout tropical America, as noted by Nee (1979).

Although sparsely found in Africa, particularly failing to naturalize in Ghana where the fruits are deemed poisonous (Bukenya & Hall, Bothalia 18: 83, 1988), Mansfeld (2001) highlights its potential as a source of solasodine for medicinal purposes and glycoalkaloids for schistosomiasis control.

Distribution:

  • Native to the West Indies, it is also cultivated in various regions including the US, India, Hong Kong, and Australia.
  • Its cultivation extends to Panama, Guyana, Surinam, French Guiana, Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador, Bolivia, Brazil, and Peru.
  • Additionally, it is cultivated as an ornamental and found in Ghana, Burundi, Angola, Malawi, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, and South Africa.

The stems and fruits of this plant hold great appeal to florists for their unique appearance, making them a captivating addition to floral arrangements that can endure for weeks in a vase. They are often made into small animals using googly eyes and decorated in baskets and in built into huge decorative towers in their native lands.

 

Grow Notes
Place in a location that receives full sun. Give them a feed with Osmocote or Dynamic Lifter (Chicken manure pellets) twice a year and water regularly as they have a high-water requirement and will wilt easily, so don’t let them dry out totally.

Sow
Sow your seeds on a well-drained medium such as 75% sand and 25% Peat moss, or a potting mix with 50% coarse sand added to it. Just cover the seed with a sieved layer of sand or potting mix.

Keep them in a very bright, filtered light location and maintain consistent moisture levels, not sopping wet, just nice and moist.

When the seedlings reach 2-3 cm high, carefully transplant them to 5 cm pots using a well-draining potting medium. Add a pinch only of Osmocote or similar to each pot and water well. Keep your plants in very bright filtered light and do not let them dry out.

Germination
It may take up to a month for all the seed to germinate, don’t throw them out!

Maturity
Give your plant a good hard prune yearly to thicken it up, the more branches the more fruit so don’t be afraid to nip the tips of the branches off now and then.

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PLANT AND HAVE NEVER ENDING SALAD GREENS FOR YOUR TABLE THAT ADD PIZZAZZ TO ANY RECIPE! GARNISH AND ADD TO SOUPS, SALADS, STIR FRIES AND MORE! Cress has broad leaves and frilly edges. The leaves have a mild peppery bite to them, with a bit of sweetness. The plant reachesSee more...

PLANT AND HAVE NEVER ENDING SALAD GREENS FOR YOUR TABLE THAT ADD PIZZAZZ TO ANY RECIPE! GARNISH AND ADD TO SOUPS, SALADS, STIR FRIES AND MORE!

Cress has broad leaves and frilly edges. The leaves have a mild peppery bite to them, with a bit of sweetness. The plant reaches 8 to 10 inches (20 to 25 cm) tall.

Grow Notes
Prefers full sun in well-draining soil.

Sow
Autumn sowings are ready to harvest in the early Spring, and you can get a second crop by planting in Summer and harvesting in the Autumn.

Sow direct or raise seedlings by planting seeds at 4mm depth.

Keep soil moist, not wet.

Germination
10-14 days at 7-15°C

Maturity
20-25 days.

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USED A PURGATIVE BY DR CULVER, A PIONEERING PHYSICIAN IN THE 18TH CENTURY, IT'S AN ATTRACTIVE HERB WITH WHITE, LAVENDER AND BLUE BLOSSOMS THAT BUTTERLIES, BIRDS AND BENEFICIAL INSECTS ADORE! Blooms mainly in summer with about 8 weeks of colour, this is native to North America and is often foundSee more...

USED A PURGATIVE BY DR CULVER, A PIONEERING PHYSICIAN IN THE 18TH CENTURY, IT’S AN ATTRACTIVE HERB WITH WHITE, LAVENDER AND BLUE BLOSSOMS THAT BUTTERLIES, BIRDS AND BENEFICIAL INSECTS ADORE!

Blooms mainly in summer with about 8 weeks of colour, this is native to North America and is often found in the prairies there. Bees love it for its sweet nectar and our native bees are included here.

Most at home along streams and waterways on the prairies, it is at home in any garden that can reticulate its plants, it is hardy down to at least ?20 °C , and grows in full sun to part shade and any moist, well-drained soil.

Grow notes:

Culver’s root grows best in full sun and medium to wet, well-drained, humus-rich soil. It tolerates light shade, but too much shade may cause the plant to develop a weak central stem and fall over. Regular watering and a 10cm thick layer of mulch will help Culver’s root grow well in average soil.

Sow:

Put seeds into a zip lock bag and put them in the fridge for 6 weeks over winter or plant them direct into the garden in early winter, they need cold to break hibernation. Plant your seeds into rich moist and well drained soil in late Winter to mid spring. Cover seeds very lighy and press down, water in with a fine spray.

Keep seeds damp. Don’t allow them to dry out, if needed you can wrap them in plastic wrap right over the whole pot to keep moisture in.

Plant them out when a few inches tall.

Germination: 10 to 20 days at 15C to 20C

These can wait for the right conditions so don’t throw you pots out!

 

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HERBALIST’S GARDEN - BLACK CUMIN NIGELLA SATIVA -– A HERB FOR COOKING AND MEDICINAL USES! PLUS, IT’S A LOVELY FLOWERING PLANT, NIGELLA SATIVA PROVIDES BLACK CUMIN SEEDS AND IT’S THESE THAT ARE USED IN COOKING AND FOR NATURAL MEDICINES. Description Black Cumin has been in use since ancient times. SeedsSee more...

HERBALIST’S GARDEN – BLACK CUMIN NIGELLA SATIVA -– A HERB FOR COOKING AND MEDICINAL USES! PLUS, IT’S A LOVELY FLOWERING PLANT, NIGELLA SATIVA PROVIDES BLACK CUMIN SEEDS AND IT’S THESE THAT ARE USED IN COOKING AND FOR NATURAL MEDICINES.

Description
Black Cumin has been in use since ancient times. Seeds excavated at the Syrian site Tell ed-Der have been dated to the second millennium BC.

They have also been reported from several New Kingdom levels of ancient Egyptian archaeological sites. In the ancient Egyptian civilization, cumin was used as spice and as preservative in mummification!

From Wikipedia: Cumin seed is used as a spice for its distinctive flavour and aroma. It is globally popular and an essential flavouring in many cuisines, particularly South Asian (where it is called jeera, Northern African, and Latin American cuisines.

Cumin can be found in some cheeses, such as Leyden cheese, and in some traditional breads from France. It is commonly used in traditional Brazilian cuisine. Cumin can be an ingredient in chilli powder (often Tex-Mex or Mexican-style), and is found in achiote blends, adobos, sofrito, garam masala, curry powder, and bahaarat. In Myanmar, cumin is used as a spice. In South Asian cooking, it is often combined with coriander seeds in a powdered mixture called dhana jeera.

Cumin can be used ground or as whole seeds. It helps to add an earthy and warming feeling to food, making it a staple in certain stews and soups, as well as spiced gravies such as curry and chili. It is also used as an ingredient in some pickles and pastries.

Besides being a useful food additive, this is showing many benefits for medical uses as well.
In the traditional medicinal system, Nigella sativa is recommended to treat a wide range of ailments. The seeds of this medicinal plant have a potential role to improve the functionality of our vital physiological systems including respiratory system, gastrointestinal system, renal system, cardiovascular system, immune system and hepatic functioning.
Avicenna Journal of Medicine acknowledges the role of Nigella sativa seeds in the book; The Canon of Medicine, due to its energy boosting property which is effective to treat chronic fatigue condition and dispiritedness.

Nigella sativa seeds, also commonly known as black seeds has extensive use in India and Arab as a food additive. Both of these civilizations used the oil and seeds of Herbs in the traditional medicinal system to treat several inflammatory disease conditions including bronchitis, asthma, rheumatism etc.

Always consult a medical practitioner before embarking on any program. The information on this page is not diagnostic, therefore always consult a Herbal practitioner or your GP in order to obtain a diagnosis. Never stop taking prescribed treatment without consulting your GP or a qualified Herbal practitioner. Do not take without qualified medical advice.

SEEDS DARK BLACK, ROUNDISH, EASY TO SEE AND HANDLE.

Grow Notes
Nigella prefers a sunny position with well-drained soil enriched with manure or compost ahead of planting, but they will grow in most sites and soils.

Sow
Sow seeds direct in Spring or indoors early in the Autumn for transplantation to the garden once temperatures rise in Spring.

Compost should be kept slightly moist, but not wet at all times.

Thin seedlings to 20cm apart.

Germination
10-14 days at 15-20°C

Maturity
Herbaceous Annual.

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ALSO CALLED SOURSOP – CUSTARD APPLE! A WONDERFUL FRUIT WITH REALLY HEALTHY BENEFITS AND THE TASTE OF SWEET CUSTARD! CUSTARD APPLE IS ALSO CALLED SOURSOP AND IS ONE OF THE FEW TROPICAL FRUITS THAT ARE READY TO BE EATEN IN WINTER! It's a small, upright tree to 9 metres inSee more...
ALSO CALLED SOURSOP – CUSTARD APPLE! A WONDERFUL FRUIT WITH REALLY HEALTHY BENEFITS AND THE TASTE OF SWEET CUSTARD! CUSTARD APPLE IS ALSO CALLED SOURSOP AND IS ONE OF THE FEW TROPICAL FRUITS THAT ARE READY TO BE EATEN IN WINTER!
It’s a small, upright tree to 9 metres in it’s natural environment but usually does not grow as tall when potted or outside it’s natural range. It will bear many fruits a year once established. Fruits range in size from 400 grams to 1.5 kilos!
Custard apples contain anti-oxidants like Vitamin C, which helps to fight free radicals in our body. It is also high in potassium and magnesium that protects our heart from cardiac disease. Not only that, it also controls our blood pressure. Custard apples contain Vitamin A, which keeps your skin and hair healthy.
The easiest way to eat custard apples is to just cut it in half or pull apart with your hands and use a spoon to scoop out the flesh to eat. Try adding a little lime juice for a complementary flavour. The taste of a custard apple has been described as like sweet custard mixed with cooked apple or pear flesh.
While research suggests soursop can fight cancer, it has not been studied in humans.
Custard apples have a deliciously creamy texture, sweet taste and are best enjoyed fresh or as a simple yet impressive dessert. Custard apples are eaten when soft and only the flesh is eaten.
Custard apples can range in size, from 500g – 1.5kg, which makes them perfect to share with family and friends. You can simply enjoy them fresh by cutting a custard apple in half and scooping out the flesh.
Custard apples pair well with other fruits such as banana, pineapple, papaya and orange and with flavours such as cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, vanilla and honey. They are also superb as a simple dessert. Here are some ideas!
Serve a custard apple with shredded coconut and nuts on top of breakfast cereal for a morning treat!
Tease out the flesh from a custard apple, discarding the skin and black seeds, and pop the flesh into a blender with ice cream, milk and honey for a decadent smoothie!
How to plant:
STORE SEEDS IN YOUR FRIDGE (NORMAL SHELF).
SOAK FOR 24 HOURS BEFORE PLANTING IN ROOM TEMP. WATER. Plant in fertile soil with a good compost element. Plant about 2cm deep, cover and keep moist, plant in warmer months of the year or under a cloche or on top of a heated mat.
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