CHAMOMILE GERMAN HERBS HERBAL MEDICINAL HONEY BEES LOVE IT! $2.30

HERBALISTS GARDEN! GROW YOURSELF SOME CALMING GERMAN CHAMOMILE! A GREAT GROUND COVER FOR POOR SOILS! AND AN AGES OLD REMEDY FOR EVERYTHING FROM A SORE THROAT TO GINGIVITIS! AND A LOVELY FLOWER! BEES LOVE IT TOO!

Description
A non-GMO, heirloom variety which is the age old variety used throughout the centuries.

This is great for sandy areas that need coverage, it is a ground cover variety that thrives on neglect and give hundreds of flowers to pick every year. A Chamomile pillow can be made by using a netting jewellery pouch type bag tied at the top, pop it inside your pillow case. Dry the flower heads to make your own tea!

German chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla) has been used throughout history for multiple purposes. Chamomile is one of the most popular herbs in the Western world.

There are two plants known as chamomile: the more popular German chamomile (Matricaria recutita) and Roman, or English, chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile).

Although they belong to different species, they are used to treat the same health problems. Both are used to calm frayed nerves, to treat stomach problems, to relieve muscle spasms, and to treat skin conditions and mild infections.

Chamomile has been used as a medicine for thousands of years, dating back to the ancient Egyptians, Romans, and Greeks. Historically, it has been used to treat many conditions, including:

Chest colds
Sore throats
Abscesses
Gum inflammation (gingivitis)
Anxiety
Insomnia
Psoriasis
Acne
Eczema
Minor first-degree burns
Inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis)
Stomach ulcers
Children’s conditions such as chickenpox, diaper rash, and colic

Animal studies have shown that German chamomile reduces inflammation, speeds wound healing, reduces muscle spasms, and serves as a mild sedative to help with sleep. Test tube studies have shown that chamomile can kill bacteria, fungus, and viruses.

Plant Description

The tiny daisy-like flowers of German chamomile have white collars circling raised, cone-shaped, yellow centers and are less than an inch wide, growing on long, thin, light green stems.

Sometimes chamomile grows wild and close to the ground, but you can also find it bordering herb gardens. It can reach up to 3 feet high. German chamomile is native to Europe, north Africa, and some parts of Asia.

It is closely related to Roman chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile), which, although less commonly used, has many of the same medicinal properties.

What’s It Made Of?

Chamomile teas, ointments, and extracts all start with the white and yellow flower head. The flower heads may be dried and used in teas or capsules, or crushed and steamed to produce a blue oil, which is used as medicine.

The oil contains ingredients that reduce swelling and may stop the growth of bacteria, viruses, and fungi.

Pediatric

Ask your doctor before giving chamomile tea to a child. Children under 5 should not take more than half a cup of tea per day.

To relieve colic: Some doctors suggest 1 – 2 oz. of tea per day. Your doctor may recommend other doses.

Adult

Tea: Pour 1 cup of boiling water over 2 – 3 heaping Tbs. (2 – 4 g) of dried herb, steep 10 – 15 minutes. Drink 3 – 4 times per day between meals

Gargle or mouthwash: Make a tea as above, then let it cool. Gargle as often as desired.

Inhalation: Add a few drops of essential oil of chamomile to hot water (or use tea) and breathe in the steam to calm a cough.

Bath: Use 1/4 lb. of dried flowers per bath to a full tub of water to soothe hemorrhoids, cuts, eczema, or insect bites.

Poultice: Make a paste by mixing powdered herb with water and apply to inflamed skin.

Cream: Use a cream with a 3 – 10% chamomile content for psoriasis, eczema, or dry and flaky skin.

Precautions

The use of herbs is a time-honoured approach to strengthening the body and treating disease. Herbs, however, can interact with other herbs, supplements, or medications. For these reasons, you should take herbs with care, under the supervision of a health care provider.

German chamomile is considered generally safe but pregnant women should avoid chamomile. Asthma sufferers should not ingest chamomile but can grow it.

Always consult a medical practitioner before embarking on any program. The information on this page is not diagnostic, therefore always consult a herbal practitioner or your GP in order to obtain a diagnosis.

Never stop taking prescribed treatment without consulting your GP or a qualified herbal practitioner. Do not take without qualified medical advice.

Grow Notes
Chamomile will bloom more often when there is good drainage in the soil, a soil with a PH of 5.5-7.5 is optimal. It likes full to part sun, plant 30cm apart.

Sow
Chamomile does not like too much disturbance so if you can sow direct into the garden you should, however a tray is fine if you can wedge the seedlings out with the soil that surrounds them and them space them out in your garden.

Spread seeds over the moist soil and cover very lightly at 1mm, keep the soil moist until germination then gradually cut down the watering times.

The best time to plant is from late Winter to mid-Summer, I have been able to germinate this between these times very well. If you are in a colder environment wait until daytime temps are around 22C.

Germination
7-14 days at 20-30°C

Maturity
65 days

In stock

Seed Count: 75
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